Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently got introduced to solfege and also decided that I need some vocal practice to improve my sax playing.
I have no idea where to start, I never been in choir or learned how to use my voice.
When singing, I can't tell what pitches I'm singing, or when I hear others, I don't know what pitches they are singing.
Is this necessary?
Or maybe I should ask, how do I sing?
I also don't think that the Do in Solfege would consistently be a C.
I wonder how to do that also.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,978 Posts
Sit in a room with a piano for an hour a day. Hit a note on piano and then find it with your voice. At first you'll do a lot of sliding but the more you do it the better you will get (hopefully...... unless you are tone deaf) As you get better try to not slide but imaging the note in your mind and try to get your vocal tract positioned before you make a sound. I also stink at this so I know how you feel. Singing was dreadful for me in high school and college. The good thing is that if you can get up and sing a song in front of a class full of students when you are awful.........playing the sax in front of thousands isn't that big a deal.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,336 Posts
First of all, being able to hear and match pitches in order to sing and play in tune is not the same as hearing a pitch and being able to tell what note in music it represents. The latter is called "perfect pitch" and very few people have that. If you can tell if one pitch is slightly higher or lower than another when they are close then you are able to hear and adjust in order to match pitch with your instrument or your voice.

Learning and practicing solfege is a great way to develop your ear to hear intervals and learn to play tunes you know in different keys without difficulty if you know your scales in all keys.

Do is only C in the key of C major. Do is the first note of the scale or Tonic in any major key. Re is the second note, Mi the third, Fa the fourth and so on. Once you have mastered hearing and being able to sing the notes and intervals of the major scale, then you can move on to the chromatics. The chromatic scale in solfeg is as follows:

Do-Di-Re-Ri-Mi-Fa-Fi-Sol-Si-La-Li-Ti-Do
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
Joined
·
5,528 Posts
Here's what a self-taught ignorant guys like me has learned about this...

For me, music has never been about practice. Instead it always has to ultimately be about performance. And voice training can be the same. If you join and perform with a choir, you will naturally learn much of what you are looking for. After tuning my sax to a concert F for thirty years, I can always sing one. That gives me a tuning note. After that, it just becomes a matter of site reading the music just like when playing sax. Soon it works on the unconscious level and you just "know" how to do it.

And one of the advantages of choir is learning where you fit in the harmony. I sing tenor, so I have learned where the tenor parts usually fit into the choir's mix. I learned this watching the old guys that have never had any musical training, but who sing great tenor. They see the notes in the music go up higher and then seem to just know what notes to sings based on the melody. This is an awesome talent to develop when learning to adlib on sax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
hi, there

here is my five cent comment. I do singing can be taught anyone who can hear the difference between the bells in the church tower = not tone deaf.

Well my own story as a kid I was a great singer until puberty and never bothered again until my 25 years of age.
Did a lot of sing along with various cd's and got back. Later here is where voice break through came in after joining a church choir where the Organ player was also a voice coach.

If you really want to strive for opening up your voice to the full potential then a lot of scale exercise is needed to teach your voice lips the strengthening on different notes. Also your mouth positioning has a lot to say in this projecting sound.

one of the easiest drills is try to hum a scale cause here you won't have the problem on the mouth positioning at first and no funny stretch of the neck when you try to go to the limit of your range. Try this out first and do some scale with hum.
if you need more update the thread and I'll guide/assist you.

Cooledit
 

·
Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
8,048 Posts
Whether it be your voice or an instrument. Sitting for hours at the piano and concentrating on pitch training is the only way I was able to master it.

Some people think that you're born with perfect pitch but I think it is years in the making.

My music theory professor in college pulled his hair out during my freshman year teaching me the solfeggi method.

B
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,870 Posts
Solfège is with a movable do. You do not need to have perfect pitch for it. The do is just the first note of a scale
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top