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Soap and water in the sink. Rinse REALLY well. Air dry. Refluff the fibers. Return to service.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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That's it. And you should do this periodically depending on how often you play, but at least yearly.
 

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For the "fluffing" part, you can go over it with the hose on the vacuum cleaner when it is dry. That takes away any loose fuzzies.

Mark
 

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Use a pull-through swab a couple of times before inserting the pad-saver so all it really needs to do is pull the moister out of the tone hole chimney's and you won't need to clean it for years.
 

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My teacher and mentor told me to throw them away and I did some research too and I stopped using them a while ago. No pad savers of any brand for me.

I will just throw them away :)
 

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SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014, Disti
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My teacher and mentor told me to throw them away and I did some research too and I stopped using them a while ago. No pad savers of any brand for me.

I will just throw them away :)
Just curious. How do you make sure that the moisture is off of the tone hole "walls" after the gig to keep dried sediments from possibly collecting on the lower sides that a swab does not touch? Especially the left hand tone holes.

I would throw them away and replace them with HW Padsavers. They are much better IMO
Good idea. Never heard of them.
 

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Just curious. How do you make sure that the moisture is off of the tone hole "walls" after the gig to keep dried sediments from possibly collecting on the lower sides that a swab does not touch? Especially the left hand tone holes.
I just use either a Hodge Silk Sax Swab or a chamois swab a few times after playing, both of them are really good. I also leave my sax outside overnight and not in the case, that way all the moisture dries up.

For what I read about the pad savers, they tend to shed and the micro hairs will damage your pads on the long run.

My teacher has a nice 5 digits Mark VI and he does not even clean it, ever :), anyway, I have quit using those pad savers for at least a year and my saxes are all good.

Best,
 

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I just use either a Hodge Silk Sax Swab or a chamois swab a few times after playing, both of them are really good. I also leave my sax outside overnight and not in the case, that way all the moisture dries up.
Those are perfectly fine options.

For what I read about the pad savers, they tend to shed
No, they don't.

and the micro hairs will damage your pads on the long run.
No again. Moreover, the best way to use a Pad Saver is as a swab that you insert and remove. You are under no obligation to leave it inside the sax.

My teacher has a nice 5 digits Mark VI and he does not even clean it, ever :)
That's sort of disgusting.
 

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SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014, Disti
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Several years ago I had a tenor completely overhauled and cleaned inside and out. The tech showed me some small amounts of sediment that had dried on the bottoms of several of the upper tone hole walls (left hand). Up until then I just used a standard pull through swab.

He suggested that I try the Rico pad guard. They have worked real good (for me) on alto and tenor and I have never had an issue with any small pieces of the saver sticking to the pads. I never leave them in the sax and I also leave the case open after a gig to let it all dry. I now check the walls once in a while with a leak light to make sure that they are clean.

Just ordered the HW ones for alto and tenor. I like the way they are constructed.

I guess it just depends on what works best for the individual player.
 

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Those are perfectly fine options.



No, they don't.



No again. Moreover, the best way to use a Pad Saver is as a swab that you insert and remove. You are under no obligation to leave it inside the sax.



That's sort of disgusting.
Yes, they do shed, and yes you have no obligation to leave it inside the sax.

And if my teacher wants not to clean it is his problem.

After all, is whatever works for each individual.

Best,
 

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Yes, they do shed
You said above that you have "read" that they shed. Other people in this thread (including me) have actually used them without experiencing that problem. Do you see the problem with your position?

And if my teacher wants not to clean it is his problem, I don't think you were asked for an opinion.
When you post something in a thread, particularly something odd, you invite comment on it. Let's not descend to "No one asked you" bromides.
 

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You said above that you have "read" that they shed. Other people in this thread (including me) have actually used them without experiencing that problem. Do you see the problem with your position?



When you post something in a thread, particularly something odd, you invite comment on it. Let's not descend to "No one asked you" bromides.
I don't see a problem with my position, that is what I think, I do not have to agree with you.

And, the same way you post your opinion, I post mine. That's it for me.
 

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A lot of what we do on wind instruments is based on beliefs on this that or the other and very little is actually supported by evidence.

The padsaver thing is not different form many other things. Is there any real evidence that they really work? The only one I know is an article by Stephen Howard. (read it, do yourself a favor!)

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/Testing/Padsavers.htm

Anyway having read that padsavers don’t work and not using them on account of a read is just as good as using them because someone else wrote that they are good.

The next time that one uses two saxophones played for identical number of years and that one after several years of use and abuse has to overhaul the horn 6 months earlier because he does or not use the padsaver we will know (?) but until then we are left with out beliefs.

I use a Padsaver of an unknown brand which happens to leave NO fiber whatsoever. I have used it for at least 6 years and the horn is doing very well. If anything my tech told me to use a swab (which I own and use) more often jest for the bend which is left untouched by the padsaver.
 

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My experience as a player, music teacher, and repair tech for nearly twenty years has been that the HW Brand of Padsavers do not shed, and are a very effective way of removing moisture from the walls of the instrument. I perform regular maintenance on all of my saxes at a professional level and have found no negative effects what so ever. I have seen countless customer's saxophones that come in with other brands of padsavers that do have fibers stuck inside the bow and pads that show water damage. The conclusion I have drawn from this is not all Padsavers are created equal, and anecdotal evidence of bad experiences with the poor quality ones should not prevent players from giving the HW Brand a look. HW Padsaver
 
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