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I doubt there is an exact answer to this as it probably varies from person to person, but how do YOU increase the cents of a pitch?
Probably know as scoops, but I never got a cohesive answer to that.
What do you do to make this happen?
Here's a sound ref.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yMwc8olTLE&feature=related
He does it every where.
Different example would be, Johnny Hodges, Lester Young, Stan Getz, and so on.
Here's another one, check 1:20+
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yMwc8olTLE&feature=related
I'm asking how you do it yourself to make it happen, if you know what I mean.
 

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For Rudy, given the narrow tip openings of the day, it was probably a combination of a scoop and a slow lifting of the key a half step below the target note. I do this today on very slow upward bends, although I have to admit I don't do it any where near as often as Rudy does in Saxophobia.
 

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The pitch is being bent from below. To get a very smooth bend, I maintain my lip pressure but drop my jaw and my tongue. I'm not sure why this works, but it certainly does for me, even on a C*. It is important to maintain lip and air support. To bend upward, start with jaw/ tongue down and raise them to normal.
 

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Keep in mind that a modern Selmer C* would have been a VERY open mouthpiece by 1920 standards. I doubt anyone used one with a tip that open. Also, the level of control and the lack of a change in tone or timbre indicates this was primarily a key lift, rather than primarily a lip scoop.
 

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IMHO say you wanted to slur up to a C3 for example from the A a 3rd below, you would finger the C as normal, use your throat/tongue position to flatten the C to the A (not your embouchure) and slide up to the C. Practising the F trick/harmonics/mpc practice or just going up and down (C - A - C) from the note you want to slide up to will train your oral tract to do this, some notes are much easier than others to bend, ie D2 - G2 are difficult to bend because of the design of the saxophone, but you should still get at least a tone with these notes.
 

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Maddenma said:
Keep in mind that a modern Selmer C* would have been a VERY open mouthpiece by 1920 standards. I doubt anyone used one with a tip that open. Also, the level of control and the lack of a change in tone or timbre indicates this was primarily a key lift, rather than primarily a lip scoop.
I'm not talking about a lip scoop... it's something different. Clarinetists do the same thing. A key lift is another way to get a smooth bend, but I find that the moment the key is lifted even a little bit, the pitch jumps. Also, when the pad is almost closed, the tone quality is more covered. For me, a key lift requires a lip smear for that initial jump. It takes a lot of practice to make it that smooth. I am personally better at the technique I mentioned earlier, but plenty of people execute lovely bends with key lifting... I only mean to suggest another option.
 

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http://tamingthesaxophone.com/saxophone-note-bending.html
There is a very good explanation in that link.
( Hoping that Pete will not mind my referral)
No at all.

I tend to use a combination of bending up from a flattened note and key lifting, using mouth shaping to "blend" any apparent steps in pitch caused by key lifting.

From a standard pitch it's impossible to bend up very far at all so for any type of "effect" bending up it's worth practicing a lot of bending down, so you can then start from a note that's more or less already at the "bent down" pitch.

If IO have to do a really long bend up or smooth gliss, I start in the note bent down position and while bending up I release keys progressiveley, but also do something with my mouth that I find very difficult to explain, but it's something I learnt from trying to do some of the effects that Ornette Coleman does.

But you will find that even without that, if you can coordinate a normal lip/jaw bend up into pitch with an upward chromatic scale you can actually get it to sound quite smooth.
 

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Easier on an alto than a tenor, a seamless octave bend from middle D up to "palm key" D is possible with practice. It involves gently lifting the keys whist "doing some thing with your mouth" that to which Pete Thomas refers. In my case this involves a sort of "choking down the sound" to maintain a smooth progression whilst lifting off.
An aged old pro chum of mine does this, & years ago I asked him how he did it....he said "I cannot explain, but something happens in my throat". I thought at the time that he was reluctant to share, & told him so. When I eventually learnt, I demonstrated to him & he said "good, now explain to me how you do it"....touche...impossible to explain.
 

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For me, a key lift requires a lip smear for that initial jump.
Completely correct. You have to catch the note with your jaw, tongue and throat as you're lifting the key below or it does jump.
 

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Easier on an alto than a tenor, a seamless octave bend from middle D up to "palm key" D is possible with practice. It involves gently lifting the keys whist "doing some thing with your mouth" that to which Pete Thomas refers. In my case this involves a sort of "choking down the sound" to maintain a smooth progression whilst lifting off.
Depends on the tip opening and probably the acoustics of the player. I actually find this quite a bit easier on bari than anything else.
 

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Depends on the tip opening and probably the acoustics of the player. I actually find this quite a bit easier on bari than anything else.
I have never played a baritone but just tried the gliss, on tenor, using both a .080" and .115" tip....no problem with either; so, at least in my case, the tip size seems irrelevant.
 
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