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Hi, I have been using a Meyer NY 6 mouthpiece for the past 3 years and wanted a bigger tip opening to get a bigger sound. After some research I purchased a DAddario Select Jazz M7. However when trying to tune with band the pitch is high, I have to pull out the mouthpiece almost to the tip of the sax neck which is not good because it is not stable as it’s too lose. What should I do? Different reeds, which one, I tried Vandoren 2.5 and Hemke 3. Thank you
I am not sure if you understood what I meant about the tuning position of mouthpieces (it may be old news to you?), so just in case I made a picture:
102794


All of these mouthpieces are tuned to A=440 and checked across the range for accuracy. These are 3 mouthpieces I own, a Philtone Orion, a Select Jazz, and a Lakey. If you zoom in or look closely, you will notice the Orion sits far in on the cork, the Select Jazz is intermediate, and the Lakey is further out (it's hard to see but it's actually like a centimeter further out than the Select Jazz). If your cork gets old, or you use a narrow bore mouthpiece for a long time, other mouthpieces will sit very loosely even at the correct tuning position. So it may just be your cork, unless you're really sitting at the end. Cork replacement is normal, I had mine replaced last year. Mouthpieces also have no standard bore, I have a Yamaha 4C that is a bit loose at the correct position last time I used it.
 

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In 1980 I bought a 1941 Selmer Balanced Action Tenor Sax (which I still own by the way).

Initially I had pitch problems...the horn played very sharp and I encountered what the OP described...my mouthpiece wobbling around at the end of the neck cork.

I was playing a Wolfe-Tayne metal mouthpiece.

I put the horn in its case and did not play it for 7 years because I was so frustrated with the intonation and thinking that it was a 'clunker'.

Finally in talking with a mouthpiece refacer one day he encouraged me to try mouthpieces with larger internal volume in order to be able to push the mouthpiece solidly on the neck.

I started with a 1950's Selmer Soloist and an Otto Link STM. I was able to push them solidly onto the neck cork and play them with less intonation issues on my BA but I was not happy with the sound I was getting.

Then I discovered the Ralph Morgan 'EL' (Excalibur / Large Chamber) series of mouthpieces and that made the last bit of difference for me. I love the sound that I get with a Morgan EL. I can push it solidly onto the neck cork.

I still struggle with sharpness of the bell notes but that seems to be a flaw in the design of the Balanced Action model that was corrected a little later during the SBA era when the bell was made longer and the 'B' and 'Bb' tone holes were moved higher on the bell.

All this long story is to suggest to the OP that maybe a mouthpiece with a larger internal volume will help you with the tendency towards sharp pitch as it did me ?

I didn't see that you mentioned what brand and model of Saxophone that you play but that could affect which types of mouthpieces that would tune better than others...
 

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I own several Meyers, and a Select Jazz piece, and my experience is they all sit about the same place on the cork. It sounds like you are on the right track about biting, which would definitely make the horn sharp.

There’s a new video out this week from Dr. Wally Wallace, about overtones, the channel is the Saxophone Academy. The best way to learn proper embouchure, and fatten up your tone, is to place the mouthpiece where the horn is in tune with itself. I check this by “slurring” from B2 (lh index finger) to the same note, but fingered as Low B. I adjust the mouthpiece so that the two notes are in tune with each other. Then I adjust my embouchure so I’m in tune with the rest of the world. Dr. Wally shows how to do this with other notes as well in this video.

The reason this works is that moving the mouthpiece will affect the pitch of the “short” B much more than the “long” B. And slurring to the overtone long B requires a pretty good embouchure and air suuport, so you will naturally form a good workable embouchure. If you are pinching or biting, or not supporting the air, the overtone won’t sound well.

Also, as others have said, don’t get caught up in the tip opening wars. I remember doing that in the ‘80s, when I was playing a Link on tenor that was opened up to a 10 - 0.130”. I eventually came to my senses, and now play a 7*, and have lately begun to feel like I might want to go to a 6*...
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I am not sure if you understood what I meant about the tuning position of mouthpieces (it may be old news to you?), so just in case I made a picture:
View attachment 102794

All of these mouthpieces are tuned to A=440 and checked across the range for accuracy. These are 3 mouthpieces I own, a Philtone Orion, a Select Jazz, and a Lakey. If you zoom in or look closely, you will notice the Orion sits far in on the cork, the Select Jazz is intermediate, and the Lakey is further out (it's hard to see but it's actually like a centimeter further out than the Select Jazz). If your cork gets old, or you use a narrow bore mouthpiece for a long time, other mouthpieces will sit very loosely even at the correct tuning position. So it may just be your cork, unless you're really sitting at the end. Cork replacement is normal, I had mine replaced last year. Mouthpieces also have no standard bore, I have a Yamaha 4C that is a bit loose at the correct position last time I used it.
It’s very clear thank you. In my case the Addario Select is almost at the tip of the neck and very lose, impossible to tune and play that way. I will go back to my Meyer 6 for a while before going back up in opening again.
 

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This is a very simple problem to resolve. Simply lower the pitch of your tuning meter to A=438, and you will find yourself instantly in tune.
 
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