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Discussion Starter #1
My Pierret alto was victim to numerous leaks - one reason it played so poorly. I took it to an expert tech who fixed all the leaks right there. However, I was shocked to see that he was bending the keys! Ouch! He was bending the keys so that light wouldn't shine through when he closed them. Is this standard practice for fixing leaks? I'm happy to say that it plays much, much better now. There was a leak on practically every tone hole.
 

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Was it here I saw a cartoon of a repair shop? "Repairs $50 an hour. $150 an hour if you want to watch."
 

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queperknuckle said:
My Pierret alto was victim to numerous leaks - one reason it played so poorly. I took it to an expert tech who fixed all the leaks right there. However, I was shocked to see that he was bending the keys! Ouch! He was bending the keys so that light wouldn't shine through when he closed them. Is this standard practice for fixing leaks? I'm happy to say that it plays much, much better now. There was a leak on practically every tone hole.
By your "ouch" reaction I'd say that even you realized that the answer is clearly "no". :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Honker said:
Was it here I saw a cartoon of a repair shop? "Repairs $50 an hour. $150 an hour if you want to watch."
This is a nice guy, or he must of just liked me. He didn't even charge me for it. Maybe he felt bad because another tech had charged me $175 and didn't even come close to repairing all the leaks. Every tech I've seen so far has never heard of this horn and can't believe I'm putting so much effort (and money) into restoring it. This tech understood though and if I get an overhaul, it's going to him.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
JerryJamz2 said:
By your "ouch" reaction I'd say that even you realized that the answer is clearly "no". :shock:
I'm really not sure. He did the same thing to my new RC soprano when I took it to him with leaks. I don't know. Maybe he's not bending him. However, watching him, it looks like he was. Any techs out there know the answer?
 

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My repair guy let's me watch him work and I usually just read a music magazine so I don't get paranoid. But yeah they do heat and bend stuff sometimes if they have to.
 

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Bending, to correct/improve alignment/adjustment is a standard and major part of a manufacturer's and technician's repertoir.

I'd say that 50% of the bending I do is correction of what was done poorly in the factory. The alternative is to use other means, to ACCOMMODATE & BAND-AID what was done in the factory.
 

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playitfunky said:
So you're saying that no repairs ever consist of something being bent back into it's proper spot?
I suppose I should clarify;

In many instances, yes it is required. Very often adjustments must be made by bending. In this instance, since there were leaks in every pad/tonehole, I'd be looking at leveling toneholes and keys and doing pad work. Perhaps I'm a bit finicky about changing pads also when doing key bending on key arms/pad cups to remove leaks, as it is very difficult to get any pad with a prior conformed seat (either a good seat or a bad one - Selmer comes to mind here) to properly re-seat just by bending keys (including or not including re-heating/shifting of an old pad). Leveling of keys and toneholes can not be done with the keys on an instrument. That was the impression and vision which went through my mind upon reading the original post and would not attempt to do this type of work during a "while you wait" visit. We have clients watch us work on their instruments everyday, and this doesn't bother us a bit. I suppose that with the players understanding that this is a band-aid quick fix repair for a previous poor repair or poor manufacturing, one should seek out any port in a storm. I've seen some techs with gorilla paws that bend and wrench everything without properly analyzing the entire picture.
 

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Honker said:
Was it here I saw a cartoon of a repair shop? "Repairs $50 an hour. $150 an hour if you want to watch."

You forgot about the $200 an hour, if you had already tried to fix it and you couldn't do it, and the $250 and hour if you did the same, but want to watch!:twisted: :D ;) :shock:
 

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I get horns with bent keys and bent everything else in for repair every day.

Instruments repair techs have many tools to bend keys.

They have these tools to bend the keys BACK WERE THEY ARE SUPPOSE TO BE.

I hear every day " I don't know how these keys got bent"

I know--- because something hit the horn or the horn hit something.

I have a sign in my shop HORNS DON'T BEND THEMSELVES

Some players try to convince me that they do.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
JerryJamz2 said:
I suppose I should clarify;

In many instances, yes it is required. Very often adjustments must be made by bending. In this instance, since there were leaks in every pad/tonehole, I'd be looking at leveling toneholes and keys and doing pad work. Perhaps I'm a bit finicky about changing pads also when doing key bending on key arms/pad cups to remove leaks, as it is very difficult to get any pad with a prior conformed seat (either a good seat or a bad one - Selmer comes to mind here) to properly re-seat just by bending keys (including or not including re-heating/shifting of an old pad). Leveling of keys and toneholes can not be done with the keys on an instrument. That was the impression and vision which went through my mind upon reading the original post and would not attempt to do this type of work during a "while you wait" visit. We have clients watch us work on their instruments everyday, and this doesn't bother us a bit. I suppose that with the players understanding that this is a band-aid quick fix repair for a previous poor repair or poor manufacturing, one should seek out any port in a storm. I've seen some techs with gorilla paws that bend and wrench everything without properly analyzing the entire picture.
Well he said, quote, "the horn has been beat up so bad that bending things won't make much of a difference." And he's right. It was a quick fix. The only other option is an overhaul, which I don't want to do until I'm sure this is the horn I'll be using for the next few years.. He's not going to go through the effort of taking off the keys without getting paid some serious bucks. An overhaul will be done on this horn soon enough.

So, it seems like what he did is pretty standard but a band-aid quick fix job by an expert repair guy. Okay.
 

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Many players just don't realise how easily keys do bend.

Take a stack key that has an off-centre key pearl. Let's say the pad does not seal well, because it is poorly adjusted. So the player, without even thinking, presses the key harder to achieve a seal. That is often enough to bend a key, especially on the larger instruments.

The technician's job is to put it back where it should be, and get the pad to seal WITHOUT that gorilla grip.
 
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