Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I mentioned that I had made a magnetic dent removal tool and was asked to post a photo so, here it is.



Pretty simple, a 1" steel bar, a 1" diam x 1/2" thick super strong magnet, and various size steel balls.

You want to use something between the sax and the magnet. Some of the kits come with lubricant or a teflon plate, I just use an old sock (classy, I know...).

It works really well for the larger dents that are not real deep. When you start getting into the smaller tubing the small balls just don't have enough mass to pull hard on the metal.

For what it cost (I think less than $20) it has worked very well for me.

Ethan
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member.
Joined
·
1,526 Posts
Man, 'You got balls!' OK, OK... Good idea, there are protocols ( proven systems of 'balling' ) that can require more tools... Good step, beat some baritone saxes when you have time... They 'always' have plenty of dents...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
38,887 Posts
wow. how does the magnet know when to stop pulling?
this is one of the worst misconceptions you don't " pull" the magnet at all when using these tools you just move the magnet and consequently roll the ball. the rolling action will burnish the bend and flatten it not the pulling . If you pull it you will make stripes in the metal.

Mountain sax , it looks very nice, good work!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
Nice and cheap, thats all that matters. I would recommend if you know someone with a lathe to turn a small mushroom shape up for the head, so that way you can use it in radius's as well

Saxmusicguy, I recieved in a mark vi once that looked very similiar to that but it still had parts of its case embedded in the nooks and cranny's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,466 Posts
Saxmusicguy, I recieved in a mark vi once that looked very similiar to that but it still had parts of its case embedded in the nooks and cranny's.
Oh my, did you repair it? (By the way, I found that picture online -- it's not mine.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Nice and cheap, thats all that matters. I would recommend if you know someone with a lathe to turn a small mushroom shape up for the head, so that way you can use it in radius's as well

Saxmusicguy, I recieved in a mark vi once that looked very similiar to that but it still had parts of its case embedded in the nooks and cranny's.
I think that the magnet is probably too fragile to put on a lathe. If you drop them or let them hit the metal rod too hard they will crack/shatter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
beyond magnetic force, how does that attach to that steel bar?
It is just the magnetic force that holds the magnet to the steel bar, but believe me, that is enough! It is amazingly difficult to get the magnet on or off without pinching yourself or letting them come together too hard. I have a piece of thin cloth between them to help make it a little easier to position the magnet and to act as a little cushion when I put them together.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
Joined
·
4,690 Posts
No mate, I meant have someone turn a steel mushroom cap for it, which will be attracted to the magnet as well, like a shoe for a horse, it allows better gliding and different profiles
 

·
Distiguished SOTW Tech
Joined
·
1,545 Posts
I have a shop made magnetic dent tool as well as a large assortment of ball bearings and dent balls large enough to do Tuba branches. Magnets are good for certain repairs. The Bundy sax pictured needs more tradiditional dent removal techniques. I would use my dent machines on portions of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
No mate, I meant have someone turn a steel mushroom cap for it, which will be attracted to the magnet as well, like a shoe for a horse, it allows better gliding and different profiles
Now I get it! That makes sense, I'll have to see if anyone around here has that capability.

Thanks!
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
I doubt the tool mentioned would actually deal with many dents.

N45 is a fairly strong grade of neodymium magnet. (And N50 and 52 are now pretty difficult to obtain) That grade, in the size mentioned, would have a pull to a thick, flat, smooth steel bar of about 47 lb. I find that in most cases I have to use my largest one, which is D2" x 2". That has a pull of 326 lb in the same situation.

Of course the pull to a sphere, through a thickness of brass is a lot less.

Here's some interesting watch-this-space stuff on neodymium: http://www.upi.com/Business_News/En...minerals-prices-skyrocket/UPI-76601308849756/
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top