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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a thread about Holton Reso-Tone saxophones*. It is a rarely seen model from the 1930s which was a professional horn. Some are silver plate and some gold lacquered with nickel keys. Thank you to LaPorte who provided the bulk of this information.

Here is a printed advert for the introduction of the Reso-Tone model.



Quote; "A Completely New Saxophone"

"This is the new Holton Reso-Tone alto saxophone, built upon new proportions and with new tonal quality, new mouthpipe, new octave key, new key guards and new thumb rest. A completely new instrument that will set a new standard in saxophone construction and tone."

*not to be confused with LeBlanc Reso-tone student clarinets.

More photos and information to follow…
;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I don't know if Holton built a tenor version. If so, it might be model 214(?).

From LaPorte: "The first photo shows the tone ring with the character 'Reso-Tone' on an alto saxophone (not very sharp), the second on a trumpet of the same period. The following will show that alto from different perspectives including the right side which can be compared with the ad. I don't bid. My wife says, that my collection is (more than) complete. She's right.

I don't know how it sounds. I think this should be a really good saxophone based on the Revelation II (some sort of deluxe). Probably a wider bore than Revelation I. I guess that Couturier's ideas moved into the Holton series of the thirties."













 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
alto: 82Zii/Medusa, tenor: Medusa, bari: B-901, sop: sc-990
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
LaPorte:

"according to the (six digit-) serial numbers:

trumpet #121511
alto #122383 (silverplated)

both were made 1937 and the

alto #123102 (gold-lacqueur)

was made in 1938.

Since 1930 all Holton saxophones were made in Elkhorn. Production in LaPorte ended 1929. The equipment of the factory was transferred to Elkhorn and the production of COLLEGIATE I/BEAUFORT AMERICAN were continued for a year or two. Those were the last saxophones originally designed by E.A. Couturier. But I'm pretty sure that his ideas of proportions lived on in the following models (REVELATION II; COLLEGIATE II and ResoTone)*. This question is for me the most interesting topic to investigate before I stop doing researches on saxophones. I'm not convinced that Holton used any Conn patents as stated by 'Ol' Bear' Cybersax (I highly rate his contributions and I have many good insights from his web site, he is a real expert.)

*Some features as brace rings or low C/Es key design can be found on REVELATION II, Collegiate II incuding the tenor, stencilled by Gretsch.
 

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alto: 82Zii/Medusa, tenor: Medusa, bari: B-901, sop: sc-990
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here is the silver Reso-Tone that was on eBay this week.













If anyone else has photos of a Reso-Tone model 204 (especially the right side), please add them to this thread. ;)
 

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If anyone else has photos of a Reso-Tone model 204 (especially the right side), please add them to this thread. ;)
Sorry, I :? forgot to send you the most important photo for identification! On this photo the character 'ResoTone' can clearly be seen, too. I've sent you a message with a photo from the right side and one of the ligature.

That's all I have.

Felix
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The mysterious:cool: right-side of the Reso-Tone:





Photo shows the original Reso ligature (on a non-original ebolin mpc).

 

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Hi, guys
I am now the owner of the lacquer 204 in Soybean's last set of pix - it's not playable at the moment, and it may be a while before I'm able to get it so, but by next week my life should be sane enough to get you any additional pictures/measurements/etc you may need, as well as posting the pix and serial # info on my other Holtons.

Dave
 

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Olds Super Line Used that Bell Tone Ring also.
 

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Olds Super Line Used that Bell Tone Ring also.
As did the Getzen Super Deluxe trumpets and trombones - beautiful horns, in an overdone '59 Cadillac kind of way, but very thin copper bells, and I've never seen one that hadn't suffered major indignities. I'm a trumpet player who's just recently crossed over to the saxophonic dark side (as my brass-playing friends would say), and one of my favorite horns is a '53 Olds Super.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Guys, are you saying Getzen and Olds used the exact same ring, or just something similar?


Buescher had a similar ring around the bell of it's Super 400 and TH&C models.
 

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As did the Getzen Super Deluxe trumpets and trombones - beautiful horns, in an overdone '59 Cadillac kind of way, but very thin copper bells, and I've never seen one that hadn't suffered major indignities. I'm a trumpet player who's just recently crossed over to the saxophonic dark side (as my brass-playing friends would say), and one of my favorite horns is a '53 Olds Super.

Dave
<---- Tubist/Olds Brasswind Collector

I tried an Ambassador Alto and really didn't like it at all. Not that they are Bad. Pretty Tone, I didn't like the key config and it was open yet stuffy at the same time.. Might have been the horn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What are we talking about? If you are quoting the Tubist/Brasswind collector, he may have been talking about an alto horn (not a saxophone). The Ambassador is not a Holton sax as far as i know.
 

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Olds Made a Line called a "The Super" They shared that tone ring on the bells, Trumpets, T-Bones, Saxes... I still haven't figured out what it's supposed to do. I can't hear any noticeable changes with or without it.
 

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Also, the Ambassador saxes from after the war were a mixture of Buescher and Martin bodies.
I've been trying to figure it out on my own.. You spoiled the surprise.... LOL Actually I adjusted and Regulated a friend's Martin indiana. It looked so similar to the Ambassador... I'm like "Hmm, Olds might have had martin make their horns."

Olds did not make any woodwinds in house.. Brass & Bugles only. My Tech told me to stay away from them. He gave me a good reason I just can't remember exactly what it was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Let's try to keep this about Holton Reso-Tone. Thanks
 

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Sorry The Trim work is neat Looks like a Deck of Cards. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
:)No problem.;)
 

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I know that mad-dog (Dave) bought the lacquer Resotone alto. I can't remember thought--did a SOTWer buy the silver one that sold on ebay? We need some updates if so!
 

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I GOOFED-- Sorry, I mis-read my new Holton tenor to be a model 244. A very close examination under a magnifying glass shows the tiny number to read 214. It has every feature of the 204 alto, but without the fancy bell rim. Perhaps by 1939, Holton felt it too expensive, or they never put in on the tenors. The engraving and decorative key guards are the same, so here is a rare "Res-O-Tone tenor. My guess is the "Res-O-Tone" name comes from the aluminum resonators on the pads. Conn and Buescher were using resonator pads from the 1920s onward. I have never seen a Holton with resonators in the 20s or early 30s. This feature was probably introduced with the Reso models in the mid-30s. I can tell these are the original pads, as there are no tell-tale scrape marks where a set of pads was removed. These are round, slightly domed aluminum discs held onto the pad by large brass rivets. I can't believe how scarce these Reso models are.
 
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