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why would it be 1914?

If it mentions a 1914 patent is certainly later.

The type should be “ Elkhorn”

Read this
http://www.saxpics.com/?v=man&manID=8
“ The Frank Holton Company of Elkhorn, Wisconsin is one of the earliest saxophone makers, with the Rudy Wiedoeft model being the most famous model that they produced (the Elkhorn being one of the more infamous). Unfortunately, these horns have questionable intonation at best, odd keywork and tinny sound. They were bought out by the G. Leblanc corporation in the 60's -- the company that makes Vito saxophones (hmm ...). They now make brasswinds exclusively. “

Being this unrestored and being one of their worst horns and given its extremely low value, unless it belonged to your grandfather and you are a wealthy person who doesn’t care about the money they spend, I would leave it very well alone as it is.
 

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what are you asking? I don’t understand. I wish you would use a more intelligible way to write.

This instrument is old, not a particularly good one, is worth , even in perfect state, less than the cost to fix.

Which means that even if you get it for free and you spend €300 to fix (we are talking of the most incredible happy scenario) it will be probably worth less.

200 what? Pesos? Dollars? Euros?

My assessment is that whatever 200 means is too much for what it is. If you have already bought it, hang it on the wall but if you are considering to buy it, DON’T.
 

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Two points:

1) The source Milandro is quoting is unfortunately not always accurate in his assessments of certain instruments. Holton saxes, particularly, are a lot better than he says.

2) however, what you are showing there is a very old Holton alto, still with original white pads, that will surely need considerable work to be playable. In reasonable playing condition (not freshly re-done, but just playable) it would probably sell for something like $200. I guess you would have to put between $200 and $500 into it just to get it playing at all. For an experienced saxophonist who didn't mind putting far more into an instrument than it's worth, it might be an interesting experiment, but not recommended for anyone else, frankly.
 

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the source I am quoting may not be always right but that particular model is not worth the bother
 

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the source I am quoting may not be always right but that particular model is not worth the bother
And unfortunately...and unusually....this is a bad bit of advice.

Yes, by all means NEVER use Saxpics to assess a Holton. First off, it was composed back in the early 2000's when vintage horns were not yet really a 'thing'. Thus, while Pete did a commendable job on what one can consider an 'early endeavor' to create an informational site...sadly many of the descriptions are quite subjective, there is more extrapolation than there should be...and...and.....and....

the site was sold to USA Horn a while ago...and the new owners have NEVER bothered to update any of the information on it; they simply utilize the site as a jump-point to their own horns for sale. Meaning, as more info was discovered over the past decade-plus, and more players experienced more old horns...there has been a wealth of information discovered which (unfortunately) is not reflected in the out-of-date text of Saxpics.

Great photo repository, however.

Of ALL the models the site lists....it is fair to say Saxpics got Holton 95% wrong (basing its assessment on only on a very few players who experienced a very few horns which, it turns out..were not even in good playing shape).

So...back to this Holton Alto here. With due respect to my friend....this is a pretty good ol' horn.

If one looks closely, it is Front-F equipped (teardrop touch), so is fully keyed. Having refurbed around a dozen Holton Splitbells...these are as nice an old Splitbell alto as any Martin or Conn of the day.

So...a $1000 'pro' sax ? No. But, a good player which, if worked up into nice shape, is quite respectable and has no significant quirks (i.e. intonation is decent, ergonomics are just as good as any other Splitbell American alto is gonna have).

1) Is it "worth the bother" putting $200-400 into to get it to play decently ? Yes, as much as it would be worth putting $400 into a Conn or Martin or Buescher of the same era. That is...if your intention is to PLAY it.

2) Is it 'worth' $200 to buy as-is ? Mmmm...give or take. That may be/have been a bit high. Typically a Holton splitbell project horn will go on eBay for around $125-150ish. So if someone is selling it for $200, you can offer $150 which is a fair offer.
If you purchased it for $200...you didn't do great...but you didn't get ripped-off either.

Date of horn....as well...ignore Saxpics...Felix (member LaPorte) came up with a useful and accurate Holton serial list quite a while ago, collecting info from actual lovers and owners as opposed to just a handful of folks who had come across neglected horns:

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?70892-Holton-Saxophone-Serial-number-registry

Below is a partial shot of one version of his list, so you can cross-reference it to determine the year of your saxophone:
 

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but have you seen the horn above?

That is a nothing special bit of horn, with signs of dents and with original white pads.

If you look it up, this model, Elkhorn, is not rare nor very expensive (I have found it for sale for $500 overhauled and nice looking).

Now OP has paid or may pay 200 something not clear which currencies is he talking about, that he is going to have to change all the pads and hand maybe have the dents on the bell removed (or not) and it will still look ugly.

He could buy a much better horn for the money.

I would never invest good overhaul money in this horn.




 

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but have you seen the horn above?

That is a nothing special bit of horn, with signs of dents and with original white pads.

I would never invest good overhaul money in this horn.


Well...what I see a splitbell, plated Holton with a teardrop front F key and old pads which seems to be in pretty OK physical shape.

I have refurbed and put many splitbell Holtons into good, serviced playing shape. Have you played a dozen or so of these ?

As YOU have said yourself numerous times over the years....whether it is 'worth' servicing is dependent upon whether one wished to own it and play it...or flip it for a profit.

If the latter, then probably 75% of old Splitbells are 'not worth it'.

But of course many players have old splitbells and play 'em and love 'em....
So.... if the former, then as you have stated yourself in the past....there's nothing wrong with putting some $ into a solid old player to get it to play well again...and play it.

This horn, if worked up, will be a solid old player which sounds nice and has no intrinsic flaws or oddities; comparable again to a Conn NW... or a Martin Handcraft splitbell.

Same pedigree...nice dark, lush tone, similar feel and response.

Nothing wrong with this horn, what I'm sayin'.
 

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Conn, Buescher, yes, this one? No
 

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So, for ddt007....

1) the age of sax can be found on Felix's chart

2) if the asking price is $200....it is a high asking price. You should offer $125-150, which is a fair offer.

But do this only if you have another $150-250 to invest in having the saxophone repaired/serviced, because it will likely need it.

If you do NOT have another $150-250 to invest in fixing it...then do not buy it.

3) Keep in mind, also...if all you have is $200 to buy an Alto Sax, and you need the sax to be in good playing condition...then that is not much of a budget and realistically speaking, you would want to increase that budget to at least $275-300 in order to buy a used sax which plays decently.

4) If you are in USA and need someone to clean and service/repair it for $150-250, send me a Private Message.
 

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Conn, Buescher, yes, this one? No
Your opinion. My opinion, having refurbed a fair # of Holton splitbells, and also having owned a couple and played them for a while...is otherwise. They are as good as other American splitbells.

I did not mean to come off a strident.... it is just that the poor internet information on Holtons (primarily due to people's lack of familiarity and experience with playing ones in good tack) has really negatively impacted the brand's reputation; when in fact when judged by the exact same yardstick one would use to conclude that Bueschers, Martins, Kings, and Conns are "classics"....a nice Holton stands up just as well....
 

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Your opinion. My opinion, having refurbed a fair # of Holton splitbells, and also having owned a couple and played them for a while...is otherwise. They are as good as other American splitbells.

I did not mean to come off a strident.... it is just that the poor internet information on Holtons (primarily due to people's lack of familiarity and experience with playing ones in good tack) has really negatively impacted the brand's reputation; when in fact when judged by the exact same yardstick one would use to conclude that Bueschers, Martins, Kings, and Conns are "classics"....a nice Holton stands up just as well....
Yes, I knew there was bum info when I read about the supposed "bad intonation" of Holtons because I had already had experience with a very good Holton soprano. The guy selling it told me "it doesn't play in tune". I shoved the mouthpiece clear up against the octave key post and it played perfectly in tune. I only regret that the lead player in our college big band, who had been using it for two years because it played better than any other soprano he'd ever played, convinced me to sell it to him. The action was not as slick as the Buescher I own now, though, I can remember that even though it's been many years. Maybe a really good setup would have helped.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yes i bought it , i want to repair it , i m mecanic from education . I order polster etc . he guy that sold me told me to sandblast it for a beter dark sound ?????? or with a bath acid ?????? It s on th way
 

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Do not sandblast it or acid bath. Those things will not change the sound and are not worth it.
 

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I know it's a completely different animal, but I have a Holton 233 alto that I really look forward to overhauling. It has a really wonderful tone (Conn-like to me ears). The build quality is outstanding and is the most comfortable vintage alto I've ever had under my fingers.
 
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