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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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Discussion Starter #1
No this isn't a quiz - mere curiosity. I get the flowery stuff as trivia ornaments on most saxes. Naked lady's don't require much explanation either, only why they tended to get more covered up as the 20th century progressed, but let's leave that for some other time. Portraits make some sense too. But why "Mars Attacks" or "Crown and Lion" on Martins, "Top Hats and Cane"(s) along with Castles on Bueschers, lakes and boat scenes on Selmers? What gives? Is this just because some engraver were good at top hats and others at boats? I am wondering if anyone knows the real history behind the motives. Was there a rationale, popular demand, or what else? Would be fun to know - thanks!
 

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Yeah! I have seriously wondered about this. Every time I see this happy little kingdom by the sea...



... coexisting with this snazzy nighttime attire...



I can only wonder: WHAT where THEY smoking? And where to find?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
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Well, the Martin Mars Attack is really just an Art Deco cityscape with trendy 1930s searchlights (20th Century Fox inspiration?) and a nice little DC3 or something flying round. What else would you want to hit the jazz clubs of NY or Chicago (or in my Dad's case, the pubs in a small English market town - aspirational engraving!)?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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Discussion Starter #4
Well, the Martin Mars Attack is really just an Art Deco cityscape with trendy 1930s searchlights (20th Century Fox inspiration?) and a nice little DC3 or something flying round. What else would you want to hit the jazz clubs of NY or Chicago (or in my Dad's case, the pubs in a small English market town - aspirational engraving!)?
In your dad's case I think the Queen would rather have preferred the crown and lion for her underlings.
 

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In your dad's case I think the Queen would rather have preferred the crown and lion for her underlings.
You may laugh, but one of the first gigs he did with it was a local celebration of the wedding of Princess Elizabeth and Prince Phillip in 1947. She never said she minded the cityscape engraving ... but she's always very discreet.
 

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I defy anyone to find any concrete visual symbolism in this engraving.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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4,120 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
You may laugh, but one of the first gigs he did with it was a local celebration of the wedding of Princess Elizabeth and Prince Phillip in 1947. She never said she minded the cityscape engraving ... but she's always very discreet.
That's way cool!

I defy anyone to find any concrete visual symbolism in this engraving.
None, but perhaps a solid consumption of alcohol or mental disease (just kiddin'). I love this engraving and had a tenor like yours. However, I never had an easy time with the left pinky cluster on Conn tenors (something about the angle), and after I dislocated my left pinky finger, it is a no go, period. I still miss the horn and can rattle of the serial number in my sleep.
 

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Indistinguishable Resident Buescher Bigot and Foru
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I defy anyone to find any concrete visual symbolism in this engraving.
The engraver was a fan of football and alien flora.

You can see on the bottom half there's an american football bouncing around leaving little marks, only to be caught in the end by something resembling the flora alien from Little Shop o' Horrors.

Regarding the top half, more of the football theme, with an arrow coming around the front of C.G. Conn to draw your eyes to the football again.

The engraver was definitely into sports :whistle:....
 
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