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Hi... I've recently got back to playing the sax regularly and decided to get some mp.I've been playing a Java A85 for the last 10 years and before anly played a Selmes C**.
I bought a Otto Link Tone Edge #6 (new) and a Otto Link STM 5* (used, from a member of SOTW).
When I got playing the TE I loved it from the 1st second. Easy and great sound and control... from soft playing to hard blowwing with complete control.
but I´ve had some difficulty with the STM on the higher octave... Obviously they are different mp, but would like you're input:
-Is this rellated to the different tip opening (I've tried harder reeds but with not mutch improvment...) --- do you think I should sell this one and get a #6 (will it make thet mutch of a difference?)
- Is it only a question of embouchure... and with a little more time playing it will be resolved
- Has anyone else had the same difficulty with this mp?

Thxs
 

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try to take more mouthpiece in. I suspect that you have an embouchure which is centred very much at the tip of the reed, as you go up you probably (as most people do) make your lips firmer and in so doing you might be choking your reed.

If this is the case taking in more mouthpiece will help you when you go up but you will have to get used to this and in the beginning you will probably have less control altogether.
 

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I agree with Milandro I have been playing with a stm 7 for my Alto and a 5* for my tenor for about a year now and I find that I have to put more of the mouthpiece in my mouth to get the High notes mostly on my Tenor . If you look at Sonny Rollins and Coletrane They almost eat the Mouthpiece and maybe you might try different Reeds just a suggustion. I use a Rico jazz select and a Vandoren Jazz or sometimes Rico Plastic coated Good Luck
 

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Trivial question: if your TE does it all, why bother with another mouthpiece ?
 

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Hi... I've recently got back to playing the sax regularly and decided to get some mp.I've been playing a Java A85 for the last 10 years and before anly played a Selmes C**.
I bought a Otto Link Tone Edge #6 (new) and a Otto Link STM 5* (used, from a member of SOTW).
When I got playing the TE I loved it from the 1st second. Easy and great sound and control... from soft playing to hard blowwing with complete control.
but I´ve had some difficulty with the STM on the higher octave... Obviously they are different mp, but would like you're input:
-Is this rellated to the different tip opening (I've tried harder reeds but with not mutch improvment...) --- do you think I should sell this one and get a #6 (will it make thet mutch of a difference?)
- Is it only a question of embouchure... and with a little more time playing it will be resolved
- Has anyone else had the same difficulty with this mp?

Thxs
If I am not mistaken, all except the Super Tone Master are hard rubber mouthpieces. Did you ever played metal before you bought the Tone Master?


If the answer is no, then you might want to hold off and don't sell the Super Tone Master just yet.

Hard rubber and metal mouthpieces can play and respond very differently. The problem might just be that you need time to feel out the adjustments to your breathing and embouchure. If you are not familiar with metal, you might just need to keep playing it for a while before things come together.

I play both hard rubber and metal. I have an Otto Link Super Tone Master (Metal) but I am regularly using a Peter Ponzol Custom (Hard Rubber) as my main mpc. If I take long breaks and don't play the Link for a long time, I always have to take some time to re-acquaint myself with her before it feels comfortable.

The response of every metal mouthpiece that I have ever played has always been different, and usually a bit more sensitive and temperamental than hard rubber at first. Most tend to do weird things and squeak and squawk badly if you don't learn to control them. I think that metal requires more support and embouchure control than most hard rubber pieces.

Reeds can seriously make a difference as well. Just because a reed works on your hard rubber mpc does not mean that it will do so well on the metal. So, I would suggest using a fresh reed on the STM and press on from there to see if it makes a difference.

Also, since you said that you had not been playing sax regularly, your breathing and embouchure might be in rehab right now a little bit. Take your time with getting up the registers, listen closely for any buzzing or weirdness in your tone because that could just mean you need to make reed adjustments, ligature adjustments or lip adjustments.

I would say give yourself about a week if possible and, if not, at least a couple of days playing around with it and getting used to it. If it still doesn't work out, let another sax player try it out if possible. If they have the same problem, THEN It's time kick that puppy to the curb!

Of course, if you just don't like it, get rid of it now.

Best of luck to you!

Chopster
 

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If I am not mistaken, all except the Super Tone Master are hard rubber mouthpieces. Did you ever played metal before you bought the Tone Master?


If the answer is no, then you might want to hold off and don't sell the Super Tone Master just yet.

Hard rubber and metal mouthpieces can play and respond very differently. The problem might just be that you need time to feel out the adjustments to your breathing and embouchure. If you are not familiar with metal, you might just need to keep playing it for a while before things come together.

I play both hard rubber and metal. I have an Otto Link Super Tone Master (Metal) but I am regularly using a Peter Ponzol Custom (Hard Rubber) as my main mpc. If I take long breaks and don't play the Link for a long time, I always have to take some time to re-acquaint myself with her before it feels comfortable.

The response of every metal mouthpiece that I have ever played has always been different, and usually a bit more sensitive and temperamental than hard rubber at first. Most tend to do weird things and squeak and squawk badly if you don't learn to control them. I think that metal requires more support and embouchure control than most hard rubber pieces.

Reeds can seriously make a difference as well. Just because a reed works on your hard rubber mpc does not mean that it will do so well on the metal. So, I would suggest using a fresh reed on the STM and press on from there to see if it makes a difference.

Also, since you said that you had not been playing sax regularly, your breathing and embouchure might be in rehab right now a little bit. Take your time with getting up the registers, listen closely for any buzzing or weirdness in your tone because that could just mean you need to make reed adjustments, ligature adjustments or lip adjustments.

I would say give yourself about a week if possible and, if not, at least a couple of days playing around with it and getting used to it. If it still doesn't work out, let another sax player try it out if possible. If they have the same problem, THEN It's time kick that puppy to the curb!

Of course, if you just don't like it, get rid of it now.

Best of luck to you!

Chopster
I would say it's not mostly the material (metal or hard rubber) but rather the shape of the mouthpiece and how it feels in your mouth, with the consequent adjustments that you need to make.
 

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I would say it's not mostly the material (metal or hard rubber) but rather the shape of the mouthpiece and how it feels in your mouth, with the consequent adjustments that you need to make.
Good point. Actually, I would tend to agree with you on that jlima.

The material can make a difference though. Hard metal and rubber mouthpieces with similar internal dimensions, shape and baffle will generally produce sound results which are nearly identical with any differences usually being undetectable to the end listener.

However, the material can have an impact on the player including the amount and quality of the vibrations going through the player's head which can cause a difference in the player's perception of the sound, especially if they don't use cushions.

Also, as you stated, the shape and feel of the mouthpieces are the most important factors as well.

The thing is, I have always found the smaller bite of most metal mouthpieces to be the factor that makes them more difficult to control, especially for a beginner.

In fact, the difference between metal and hard rubber is usually the dimensions of the mouthpiece because metal pieces can, and very often are, manufactured with smaller external dimensions than hard rubber which affects the feel you get and forces the adjustments in breathing and embouchure that I talked about. I think this is what makes them seem a little more finicky to me if I stay away from them for any length of time. That is why I suggested that Ribeiro should give it some time and play around with the piece before making a decision.

Chopster
 

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Good point. Actually, I would tend to agree with you on that jlima.

The material can make a difference though. Hard metal and rubber mouthpieces with similar internal dimensions, shape and baffle will generally produce sound results which are nearly identical with any differences usually being undetectable to the end listener.

However, the material can have an impact on the player including the amount and quality of the vibrations going through the player's head which can cause a difference in the player's perception of the sound, especially if they don't use cushions.

Also, as you stated, the shape and feel of the mouthpieces are the most important factors as well.

The thing is, I have always found the smaller bite of most metal mouthpieces to be the factor that makes them more difficult to control, especially for a beginner.

In fact, the difference between metal and hard rubber is usually the dimensions of the mouthpiece because metal pieces can, and very often are, manufactured with smaller external dimensions than hard rubber which affects the feel you get and forces the adjustments in breathing and embouchure that I talked about. I think this is what makes them seem a little more finicky to me if I stay away from them for any length of time. That is why I suggested that Ribeiro should give it some time and play around with the piece before making a decision.

Chopster
very good points here, Chopster!
 

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I was playing on a Meyer 7M for years, switched just recently to Otto Link STM 6 on alto. Got it refaced, and now it plays just as well as the Meyer. Actually is easier to hit the higher notes because of the baffle, and still easy to play the lows. I don't take in much mouthpiece, and switching over I didn't need to change my embouchure at all.

Think it might be that particular STM not being that good. I've played like 10 or so, and none of them were that great. Played a bunch of TE's and they didn't play that well for me either.

Might be a facing issue? After matching the STM facing to my Meyer it just sings.
 
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