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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
a friend of mine is looking for a high end flute. She's studying at a conservatorium (music university in these regions) and want to become a professional flute player. She lives in Portugal, but wants to buy one in the Netherlands as they tend to have a wider variety.

She's looking for an instrument to use as a professional flute player, and one she can use throughout her musical carreer. Still, given the financial status of her parents, I'm looking for the cheapest option. So I'm browsing some shops and second-hand sites to see what it there to find.

But I don't know anything about flutes at all. Can someone enlighten me about which brands are commonly used in professional settings, what are normal price ranges, which features a professional flute should have etc. This way I can already make a selection of shops to visit when she comes to the Netherlands next year, hunting for the best deal to find.

Thank you for your help.

Edit : if anybody knows a good shop for flutes in the Netherlands or the north of Belgium, please feel free to hint me. I know Adams and Amsterdam Winds, but that's about it.
 

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One of the best affordable flutes I've tried is the Jupiter deMedici, they have many different models, from silver plate to full silver, I think they go from around $1800 to $2500.
The most commonly used professional flutes are Miramatsu's, Sankyo's, Miyazawa's...they are much more expensive, from $10,000 to $20,000.
Here's a good site for some info.
http://www.jennifercluff.com/buying.htm
 

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Matthew's Music (http://www.matthewsmusic.com) the Adams Flute Center (http://flutecentre.adams.nl), and Dagan Fluitatelier (http://www.dagan.nl) all have excellent selections. You're going to have to spend some serious change if you want a truly professional flute, sorry to say. She is not going to buy a DiMedici and use it for her whole career. She should be prepared to spend at *least* $5,000+ USD if she is TRULY serious about being a professional flutist at the highest competitive level.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks WoodwindNYC for the links. I'll check them out. I've found that Adams looks very expensive compared to "Amsterdam Winds" (they have quite a selection as well).

Do you have any experience with the service of these shops? I've heard some good stories about Adams and Amsterdam Winds, but I'm not familiar with the other two.

She's very aware of the fact that she will have to pay that amount of money. She is very serious about getting that carreer.
 

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Jolle said:
a friend of mine is looking for a high end flute. She's studying at a conservatorium (music university in these regions) and want to become a professional flute player....She's looking for an instrument to use as a professional flute player, and one she can use throughout her musical carreer.
Couldn't her teacher recommend an instrument? A used one from a professional ?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Her teacher will come with her to the Netherlands. I'm just checking out the shops possible, and in order to do so, I needed to know which flutes were the high ends.

Everybody thanks for the reactions.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
It should be a Muramatsu DS, according to the teacher. Now the question is, where to find the best price for these ones? Matthew's seems an option (Adams is a lot more expensive).

She absolutely wants to try different flutes of the same model, but I fear that's more a dream. I don't know a dealer who has more than one piece of his expensive instruments lying around...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you for the info, but this friend is not willing to buy online. She wants to try out different flutes of the same model before buying one.

I've been looking around, and all shops I could find, were mentioned already. If she decides not to buy in Spain, we're probabely going to take a look at Matthew's and Dagan. But that will be only next year probabely.

Thank you all for the advice, it was a great help.
 

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I would suggest a Haynes or Powell flute. First off, they are beautiful instruments and sound gorgeous. The Haynes is still the standard in the flute world. Tell her not to buy a new flute because she will lose a lot of money on resale value. Sankyo flutes are really nice also. I think the best thing for her to do is to go and try a bunch of different professional flutes. If she has to go at it blind, I would say try to get a used open hole inline low B foot Haynes.
 

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The variability of Haynes and Powell flutes make it imperative that they are play-tested before you buy. Not that any are actually bad, but since preferences vary, you might or might not get a flute with the sound and response you like. Recent flutes from Japanese makers such as Sankyo and Muramatsu are much more standardized. I personally think it would be best for most people to get an offset G. I have two inlines and actually prefer inline, but from what I have read most people feel that the offset is ergonomically better for them. There is no longer the "student flute" onus of the past relating to the offset G. Offset is now cool...

Toby
 

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I agree that offset is "hot" right now. Many older players are now suffering hand problems from inline. I have a Haynes offset with a split E for sale and it is really a very nice flute.
 

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The main thing your friend needs to do is play test as many different Flutes as she can because this is a significant investment and the wrong decision can be a very expensive mistake. She needs to buy a flute that she will be able to live with, not something that others feel that she should play. The Muramatsu's are good as are the Miyazawas, Powells, Sankyo's, Altus etc.... Remind her not to rush the decision, record herself when payign these instruments and she must take her time....
 

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She should also think about getting a very good flute and putting a great headjoint on it. As with saxes and mouthpieces the closer to your face the more important it is.
 
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