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Would it be possible for someone to explain breifly what these are and what their benefit is. I have seen them mentioned here recently and am curious.
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Hexatonics are six note scales. They are commonly made by combining two triads, such as C major with D major triads. This scale works over many different chords like C major, C lydian, D7, A- and so forth. Hexatonic scales can be made by combining any two triads of any harmonic quality (major, minor, augmented, diminished). They have a very unique sound to them.
 

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Perhaps even more accessible (and fundamental) examples would be the whole tone scale and the blues scale. Both contain six tones, as suggested by the prefix "hexa-", which means six, and the root "tonic", which reduces to "tone" and the suffix "-ic", which creates the adjective form. Just a brief study in etymology.
 

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LANDRUSAX said:
Hexatonics are six note scales. They are commonly made by combining two triads, such as C major with D major triads. This scale works over many different chords like C major, C lydian, D7, A- and so forth. Hexatonic scales can be made by combining any two triads of any harmonic quality (major, minor, augmented, diminished). They have a very unique sound to them.

Uhm, I don't really get it: a triad, is that like C-E-G and D-F#-A? If so, the hexatonic scale is these both just put together? I thought hexatonic scales also could be a whole-tone scale like: C-D-E-F#-G#-Bb...
 

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Hammertime said:
Uhm, I don't really get it: a triad, is that like C-E-G and D-F#-A? If so, the hexatonic scale is these both just put together? I thought hexatonic scales also could be a whole-tone scale like: C-D-E-F#-G#-Bb...
C E G + D F# A = C D E F# G A

C E G# = D F# A# = C whole-tone scale (based on Augmented triads)

...and my favorite
C maj + F# maj = C C# E F# G A#
 

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Is there a good book for this stuff?
 

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Walt Weiskopf (sp?) has a good book on triad pairs. I think its called Intervallic Improvisations. One of the Bergonzi books deals with this too I think.

Another book is called something like: Extentions for Jazz. Its by one of the guys who wrote paterns for jazz. Sorry I can't be more specific.
 

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Bergonzi's latest is on Hexatonics but it's difficult to find. Walt Weiskopf's book "intervallic improvisation" (I think thats the name) and gary Campbell's "Triad Pairs" are the leading books.
 

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I picked this one from an Alan Holdsworth book. C D# E G G# B C. He also sometimes uses a version of it that adds more passing tones to create a really interesting symmetrical scale. C D D# E F# G G# A# B C.
 

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Combination of A, C# and F major triads give you FG#ACC#EF, works good on a Dmi chord...

(it's also on Blues and the Abstract Truth, Oliver Nelson)
 

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I'm also a big fan of playing whatever the diatonic scale for a given chord is and omitting the root(ie. A-B-C-D-E-F over G7 or E-F-G-A-B-C over Dm7) I used to have a problem with playing too many roots on strong beats on solos, which can take the life out of an otherwise good solo.

A hexatonic scale is a term that applies to any 6 note scale, not just ones based on a combination of two triads. D-D#-E-F-F#-G is also a hexatonic scale.
 
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