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· Distinguished SOTW Technician
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I forgot this was SOTW and when you start a thread you get a number of people who answer and talk about something else that the thread starter never wanted to talk about.

I am happy for those who have a corking machine and for those who are happy about their corks. They can go about their business and I won't be at all bothered by that.

Please, take time to read what I wrote. I will say it again.

No, I am not talking of a botch, temporary, solution for if and when the cork is too thin for your mouthpiece, that is most definitely NOT what I intended to talk about when starting this thread.

I also not wanting to convince anyone who is not convinced by using cork, has a corking machine or has never heard of using thread of whatever type ( not on top of cork to make up for thickness but INSTEAD of cork) directly between neck and mouthpiece.

The PFTE quick fix has nothing to do with this.

Despite the jocular tone of the question, please force yourself to try to stay within the intent of the thread? Cheers!
Sorry Milandro! but it is nice to have a laugh in this increasingly humourless world we are living in.
BTW the big problem with thread of any sort on a tapered metal neck is --the fact that it's tapered. Eventually the string/thread is going to 'creep' hence the use of cork. On recorders and clarinet/wood flute/oboe tenons it's fine. In general corking is an easier or quicker process.
 

· Distinguished SOTW Technician
Joined
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3,403 Posts
The 'string' for want of a better term used to be available at local music shops and was a thick twine usually red in colour. I remember re stringing my recorder tenons --I was about 8/9 years of age--the recorder was rosewood-- plastic stuff was still in its infancy. A friends Dad who was a keen angler showed me how to do 'wipping' that's the way they fixed the rings onto fishing rods with twine, in this way the string cannot unwind. My own father got me some thick beeswax to finish the job off.
This was back in the day when people from my background fixed and repaired everything themselves, there were men, skilled in all trades who you could call on to make things or 'get' stuff no matter what. I used to build bike wheels from a pile of spokes and a rim when I was 11 or 12 and get them perfectly 'true' --got a book from the local library that showed you how to.
 
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