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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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19,226 Posts
Fabulous shape and appears to be original lacquer or first lacquer. The neck appears to have some pull-down...which would hurt its pricetag. Serial number places it at 1922 production year.

Too bad it was a C-melody, LOL. But don't feel bad, this is a common mistake to the uninitiated.

Market value, given new pads and its condition, and assuming it has a case... is probably around $500. C-Melodies can be difficult to sell, and Holtons have a cult following (even though they are just as good as any Conn or Buescher) so are not as 'popular' as some other vintage brands...so it is hard to ascribe an accurate market value...but that is what I would ask if I were listing it.
You see project ones go for $150-350.

If you wanted to sell it fast, ask $475 and accept offers.

If you could be patient for a month or so...list at $600 and accept offers.

On eBay it might well fetch $500+, but they you would have to pack and ship it (not difficult, but takes a bit of thought/care).

Hope this helps.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
Joined
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19,226 Posts
Sax necks, especially on older horns, sometimes have been...over time....slowly 'bent downward'. This usually isn't a single 'impact' injury....but rather, over time many players tend to 'lean downward' on the mouthpiece end of the neck, or sometimes inadvertenly apply pressure while inserting neck into the horn body.

So over time, the neck tube 'bends down' a bit. You can see in your pics that the mouthpiece end of the neck has a slight downward trajectory...it should be more or less level, horizontal, or even a bit swooping back upward.

So the neck has a tad of pulldown. This is a pretty easy repair, maybe $50 tops.

The question is....is it worth you having it repaired, or just let it be and let a prospective buyer deal with it ?

I would say...it's a bit of a wash.

On one hand one can argue that if the pulldown weren't there, then a fairly astute viewer would not consider there to be an issue and this would make the horn more desireable. So that $50 would likely be returned to you in the sale price.

The counter-argument would be...if you have invested in service of the horn already...it is in pretty fabulous shape regardless of the pulldown...so the new owner can certainly have that taken care of themselves if they find it necessary (it really isn't negatively effecting the performance/playability of the sax any).
 
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