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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased C melody saxophone for my son’s first instrument. It was sold to me at a pon shop as a tenor sax. The instrument was manufactured in Elkhorn, Wisconsin and has the serial number 12125 LP. The instrument is in great shape and has all new felts and pads. I’m interested in selling but am having trouble finding accurate history on the instrument and value of this antique. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
thank you.
 

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Fabulous shape and appears to be original lacquer or first lacquer. The neck appears to have some pull-down...which would hurt its pricetag. Serial number places it at 1922 production year.

Too bad it was a C-melody, LOL. But don't feel bad, this is a common mistake to the uninitiated.

Market value, given new pads and its condition, and assuming it has a case... is probably around $500. C-Melodies can be difficult to sell, and Holtons have a cult following (even though they are just as good as any Conn or Buescher) so are not as 'popular' as some other vintage brands...so it is hard to ascribe an accurate market value...but that is what I would ask if I were listing it.
You see project ones go for $150-350.

If you wanted to sell it fast, ask $475 and accept offers.

If you could be patient for a month or so...list at $600 and accept offers.

On eBay it might well fetch $500+, but they you would have to pack and ship it (not difficult, but takes a bit of thought/care).

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Fabulous shape and appears to be original lacquer or first lacquer. The neck appears to have some pull-down...which would hurt its pricetag. Serial number places it at 1922 production year.

Too bad it was a C-melody, LOL. But don't feel bad, this is a common mistake to the uninitiated.

Market value, given new pads and its condition, and assuming it has a case... is probably around $500. C-Melodies can be difficult to sell, and Holtons have a cult following (even though they are just as good as any Conn or Buescher) so are not as 'popular' as some other vintage brands...so it is hard to ascribe an accurate market value...but that is what I would ask if I were listing it.
You see project ones go for $150-350.

If you wanted to sell it fast, ask $475 and accept offers.

If you could be patient for a month or so...list at $600 and accept offers.

On eBay it might well fetch $500+, but they you would have to pack and ship it (not difficult, but takes a bit of thought/care).

Hope this helps.
Thank you for your feedback! Would you please describe what you mean about pull-down on the neck just for my education. I'm unfamiliar with that terminology. Thanks.
 

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Sax necks, especially on older horns, sometimes have been...over time....slowly 'bent downward'. This usually isn't a single 'impact' injury....but rather, over time many players tend to 'lean downward' on the mouthpiece end of the neck, or sometimes inadvertenly apply pressure while inserting neck into the horn body.

So over time, the neck tube 'bends down' a bit. You can see in your pics that the mouthpiece end of the neck has a slight downward trajectory...it should be more or less level, horizontal, or even a bit swooping back upward.

So the neck has a tad of pulldown. This is a pretty easy repair, maybe $50 tops.

The question is....is it worth you having it repaired, or just let it be and let a prospective buyer deal with it ?

I would say...it's a bit of a wash.

On one hand one can argue that if the pulldown weren't there, then a fairly astute viewer would not consider there to be an issue and this would make the horn more desireable. So that $50 would likely be returned to you in the sale price.

The counter-argument would be...if you have invested in service of the horn already...it is in pretty fabulous shape regardless of the pulldown...so the new owner can certainly have that taken care of themselves if they find it necessary (it really isn't negatively effecting the performance/playability of the sax any).
 

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I purchased C melody saxophone for my son's first instrument. It was sold to me at a pon shop as a tenor sax. The instrument was manufactured in Elkhorn, Wisconsin and has the serial number 12125 LP. The instrument is in great shape and has all new felts and pads. I'm interested in selling but am having trouble finding accurate history on the instrument and value of this antique. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
thank you.
Welcome to SOTW. You've come to the right place to ask questions. Maybe just a bit late but not too late. If you purchased the instrument from a pawnshop as a tenor why don't you return it ? It was mistakingly represented. If the deal was all sales are final oh well. You could always go back and see if they do have a real tenor to trade. Lastly instead of selling it there is always the potential for trading elsewhere. What type of instrument did you really have in mind. What grade level is your son ?
Loads of advice in the beginner section here.

Worst case scenario. Your son learns to play on this for a few months. Just realize changing to a alto or tenor will be another learning curve. you're also going to need a different mouthpiece.

I will say though you have one very nice Holton C Melody. Someone put a ton of work into that refurbish job. providing the tuning and assembly work was done correctly I agree with JAYELID on everything.
Although I do think it is a re-lacquer. The engraving appears to be buffed. There is no indication of ware anywhere. Including the right thumb rest. Overall just to perfect for a 98 year old sax.

Fabulous shape and appears to be original lacquer or first lacquer. The neck appears to have some pull-down...which would hurt its pricetag. Serial number places it at 1922 production year.

Too bad it was a C-melody, LOL. But don't feel bad, this is a common mistake to the uninitiated.

Market value, given new pads and its condition, and assuming it has a case... is probably around $500. C-Melodies can be difficult to sell, and Holtons have a cult following (even though they are just as good as any Conn or Buescher) so are not as 'popular' as some other vintage brands...so it is hard to ascribe an accurate market value...but that is what I would ask if I were listing it.
You see project ones go for $150-350.

If you wanted to sell it fast, ask $475 and accept offers.

If you could be patient for a month or so...list at $600 and accept offers.

On eBay it might well fetch $500+, but they you would have to pack and ship it (not difficult, but takes a bit of thought/care).

Hope this helps.
Yep, late 1922.
I'll call this one as a re-lacquer. Especially looking around the serial numbers and thumb rest. I see what you're talking about with the neck. I agree. On a longshot it could also be the angle of the photo. On the average there are more bent than not. So....
This one is really nice. A certificate of condition (and play video) from a Sax Tech may stretch this one to $750. That's a long stretch.
Have a real tenor for her son ?
 

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"having trouble finding accurate history on the instrument"
A real brief history on a C melody. Sometime after 1900 and before 1933 c Mel's had there day. Affordable and popular. Primarily for home use as family entertainment. In the key of C sheet music from a piano could be used. Sheet music was expensive and pianos popular at home. The C also Play is quieter than a alto or a true tenor. Sound was not blasting over the piano player. The rim of the bell is pointed slightly upwards. The neck strap ring is positioned so the player can lean over the piano players shoulder. Both players using the same sheet music. During the 1920s one of the worlds most popular saxophonist played a C melody as his choice instrument. Yes a C Mel was good in the day. So was a model T. Both can still be enjoyed.
After the depression along with radio becoming affordable and popular. Sax entertainment in the home waned.

Here is a good sound example with a professional player on a C melody. This is not Your Holton.
 

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That happened to me too.... bought a "tenor" but got a c-mel.
That's life.
I've kept mine.
But I'd suggest you sell yours.It's not a good first instrument. An alto or tenor would be better to start with. And a slightly more modern alto will be even easier to play.
Regards
 
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