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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, I'm terribly sorry if this is posted in the wrong section! I wasn't sure where it should go, so feel free to move it if need be.

Okay, I know very little about tech stuff... I'd like to spend 250-300 CAD on a set of nice over the ear headphones to use when I'm playing. I don't want noise cancelling as I would like to still hear my horn while I play. I'm looking for them to be as clear and loud as possible so I have an easier time hearing the chord changes from my background music. I would also like them to be wireless so I don't have chords everywhere.

I enjoy soloing with my speakers, however there not the loudest and I can't hear the background music / chord changes as easily when I'm soloing away. I figured a good set of headphones will help with this. I can also use them with I Real Pro (I have not figured out how to get I Real Pro to go through my speakers)

Do you guys have any recommendations for headphones that will fit my criteria?

I appreciate it, thank you :)
 

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You can get the Audio Technica ATH m50X's for 200 from L&M

Highly recommended. Lot's of folks are loving the audio technicas. I have the cheaper ones in the same series and they are absolutely killer as well but not as nice as the 50x's.
 

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Yea they are good but uncomfortable. Check the Sony 7506 for around 100 they sound great also I kind of like the very comfortable nose ae2 . I wear those things like 4 or 5 hours a day and they sound great
 

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I live 10 minutes away from the Audiotechnica factory and every December they have a big sale open to the public selling stuff dirt cheap and I have their headphones but to me they are soooo uncomfortable
 

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I live 10 minutes away from the Audiotechnica factory and every December they have a big sale open to the public selling stuff dirt cheap and I have their headphones but to me they are soooo uncomfortable
Different strokes I guess. I don't have any trouble wearing my less comfortable (than the 50's) 30x's for 3-4 hours at a time.
 

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The 50s are the most popular model and I have them but never actually use them . I thought the less expensive models were ok but I’m sold on Sony 7506 . They are bright but the nose sound the best to my ears . The at50s sound worthy but just couldn’t deal with them for longer then a half hour . Yep different strokes 😁
 

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Got the 50s for like 70 bucks at the sale they even sell higher end models I think but I haven’t tried them
 

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This is not really what you're asking, but you said you want them to be "loud as possible", so . . .

It's really not advisable to spend a lot of time listening via headphones at very high volume if you care about your hearing in the long term. You may not be worried about this now if you're young, but when you get older, you'll start caring if you've managed to do permanent damage to your hearing.

Is it not feasible for you to think about simply getting some better speakers and maybe a amp that's powerful enough to drive them? Depending on where you are, this is often something that you can pick up cheap locally on Craigslist. Just a thought for consideration . . .
 

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I don’t think your problem lies with the headphones as much as with the mic set up.
I use a pretty inexpensive Rode NT-USB mic with Bose headphones.
The mic has a knob to adjust the level of backing track to mic input level.
I can boost the backing or mic inputs to a level that suits.
Problem is the mic does not support Bluetooth so you need to plug your headphones into it with a lead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ah, see I dont have a microphone. I know nothing about recording equipment... that's something I'd love to purchase down the road as well! For now I just want something to enable me to hear my background music better when I'm improvising and practicing.

I just spent $150 on Bose speakers for my computer, was a little disappointed that they were not loud enough to really hear the background music when I solo. I came into some extra money and my other half agreed I could get a set of headphones to help me out.

I'd probably need to spend 5-600 on proper computer speakers, headphones would be a better option.

I'll still solo with my speakers! But when I first practice a new piece of music I'd use the head phones to help train my ear to the music and play along. That's my idea anyhow!

Unless your all suggesting a mic and a splitter and all that stuff?
 

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Ah, see I dont have a microphone. I know nothing about recording equipment... that's something I'd love to purchase down the road as well! For now I just want something to enable me to hear my background music better when I'm improvising and practicing.

I just spent $150 on Bose speakers for my computer, was a little disappointed that they were not loud enough to really hear the background music when I solo. I came into some extra money and my other half agreed I could get a set of headphones to help me out.

I'd probably need to spend 5-600 on proper computer speakers, headphones would be a better option.

I'll still solo with my speakers! But when I first practice a new piece of music I'd use the head phones to help train my ear to the music and play along. That's my idea anyhow!

Unless your all suggesting a mic and a splitter and all that stuff?
Yeah, my advice for you when starting out with all this stuff. Is 1) Buy practical things that you will use everyday(ish). So Headphones is definitely a good bet. 2)Don't buy the cheapest stuff. Get good quality stuff right off the bat. You are likely to be able to sell it on for a better price if you choose to sell it. 3)Prioritize what you want to do with what you buy. Do you want to get into recording in the near future? Then start just looking around at what is available. 4) BE INFORMED! This is the biggest one. And it's all on you. You need to spend some time doing research (as your doing now) on anything you buy. Unless you happen to be super wealthy you don't want to stress about having to buy an interface right away. Spend a good number of hours researching the type of thing your gonna buy before you buy it. Look at similar units, a lot of them will have similar features but might not be as good quality.

5)Clip on mics are great for recording too.

6)If you got a mixer you could drive the signal of your speakers so they are louder. Just be careful. Don't crank it to 11 or you'll potentially harm your speakers. I run my PC through my Mackie mixer and then into my m-audio av32 speakers (and also a nice little sony speaker). As well as all my drum and bass machines and loop station. There's a few ways to do this. An aux cable and a 1/4 inch stereo headphone adapter often works like a charm. I use a RCA Y cable into my rca input on the mixer. Lot's of mixers have usb for recording in stereo. Another option instead of splashing out on a interface as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This is just to practice my improv over backing tracks.


If I were to look at a splitter and microphone, how cheap could I get working equipment for?

Clip on mic, splitter of some sort, macbook software?

Would I want noise cancelling headphones for such a venture?
 

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This is just to practice my improv over backing tracks.
I am not at all sure why a pair of decent over ear, Bluetooth headphones isn't sufficient.
Basic Bluetooth has latency - but just for playing backing, metronome or iReal from a phone, it isn't a problem.
Overear dampens the sax so you can balance the sound levels comfortably (least, so I find)
As you see below - fit is quite personal, so it might be best to shop in person to find something comfortable. An hour or two practice with cans on can get uncomfortable/sweaty etc.
 

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Oh ok got you. You need a mixer like a small Yamaha with a effects, a mic. Like a Shure 57, and some headphones . Plug the sax into 1 channel and take your phone or mp3 and run it into the mixer. Now you can hear the sax and the music together. You can even put a little effect on the sax and your all set
 

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This is just to practice my improv over backing tracks.


If I were to look at a splitter and microphone, how cheap could I get working equipment for?

Clip on mic, splitter of some sort, macbook software?

Would I want noise cancelling headphones for such a venture?
Yeah, you should ditch that word splitter. It's a pretty different thing than what you'd need. If you have a macbook you should have garageband on there. It's more than anyone needs to get into recording for the first time. You can even do some very basic recording through the microphone on the macbook.

You'd need a mic, headphones and either a mixer with usb or an audio interface. This is going to be the thing that takes your signal and puts it into your software like garageband or audacity. Conversely if you want a much cheaper route without potentially wanting to use your microphone out in the real world you could for sure get a USB microphone. They can range from about $100 to 400-500. These act like an interface and a microphone and you can just plug them straight into your macbook. Rode makes a very nice one that I think is about $250 dollars new. But For around 100 or 150 you could probably find a Blue Yeti USB Mic or Yeti Pro.

If you want a mic to play live then a clip on and an interface.

A splitter is more like something you'd use to send audio to two different sources like a headphone splitter. They are handy but not going to help you for this.

Scarlet audio 2i4 is a nice audio interface that can be found used for around $150
Decent clip on mic could run anywhere from about $150 and up.

If you're only worried right now about practicing and not recording then headphones is a good one to get first. They don't need to be noise cancelling. In fact a lot of people dislike noise cancelling headphones for recording. Some people only want noise cancelling. It's a preference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thank you guys! You've given me some amazing information :)
For now I'll just go with headphones, they make the most sense to me. I did look at the technicas, there well priced on amazon! Now, today one of my IG friends mentioned Semi closed and Open headphones. I was not aware of these!?
Could you recommend a great Wireless brand that is semi open? I have a feeling I'll be able to hear myself playing better with a pair that is semi open, they may be perfect for what I'm looking to accomplish! Or even Open? I liked the Technicas, but they are closed and shelter my ears.
 

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Oh I just assumed he was using a mixer or some type of interface. Not sure what he is doing now....
Believe it or not...There was a time, apparently long long ago, that we used to just turn on the stereo and play along. If it wasn't loud enough we had to learn how to play softly and still sound good. :)
 
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