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Non Resident SOTW Eccentric & 2012 Forum Contribut
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a brand new Keilwerth SX90II in black nickel. Been sitting with the dealer for at last 5 years.

This instrument is particularly difficult to get the side key notes above C3 to sound.

I know it isn't just me as the head of the Jazz dept is a superb player, knows the horn as he playtested it when it first arrived and he noted that it was noticeably more difficult than a brass version of the same instrument that he tested at the same time.

I am wondering if replacing the neck with a Gloger might correct this issue.

Any thoughts or insights would be much appreciated
 

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JS Crescent, JS NOS, Selmer SBA, Couf Superba I, Conn, Buescher, King
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The neck could be a factor, as could the fit of the neck (if it has a receiver). More than likely, it's either some part of your set-up, and/or how the front-F/B/C# is set up, though. To some extent, normally, in practice, it'll probably be a combination of all of these.

You might see if your teacher will let you try his mpc with a suitable reed for you, and see if that changes things after you play on the piece for a while. Another way is to just get a Warburton .060 for sop. Eric's pieces have unusually good high note and altissimo response, and if you have the same problem on one of his sop .060 pieces you can probably rule out the mouthpiece as a significant barrier.

Before getting another neck, your best first move is to make sure everything is in proper repair, and that the mpc and/or reed aren't working against you.
 

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Non Resident SOTW Eccentric & 2012 Forum Contribut
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply. My teacher has tried it with his mpc and found the same problem and I have two Giardullo modded pieces one a older large chamber and an SR Tech that Joe extensively modified that is a more modern design. I have no difficulty at all in getting those same notes on either of the BW sops that I have and with the SML I have to focus on technique to nail them it is still way easier than the Keilwerth.

I note that there is quite a difference in shape of the octave pip's inside the two necks that came with it with the curvy neck being smoother and less blocky looking although both of them stick out into the airstream a lot more than any of the other sops I own. Hard to say but the curvy neck may be very slightly easier play them with. Still playing around with that but in either case I feel like I have been launched back to beginner sax world.

The instrument has been to the tech a couple of times with no appreciable difference yet. I have Steve Howard's manual on the way and hope to perhaps have a better insight. Having said that, I am certain that the wealth of knowledge in this forum can help to shed some light
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Logician
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This instrument is particularly difficult to get the side key notes above C3 to sound.
This is a commonly reported problem with Keilwerth sopranos, as well as Selmer Mark VI's. Now I've never had a Keilwerth, but moving up to a more open tipped mouthpiece made playing the upper keyed range of my VI soprano easy as pie.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/ Forum Contributor 2010
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This is a commonly reported problem with Keilwerth sopranos,
Indeed. A suggested solution I've seen more than once is a Runyon Custom mouthpiece, 7 or bigger. I had the same problem with a different soprano, and a Runyon 8 worked like a charm.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Technician
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Im sorry to say this, but I see this very often with the sx series, they are difficult to almost impossible in the palms, however when you switch the neck out with a yammy neck they sing, theres a noticeable difference between the two necks for octave pip placement
 

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I have an SX-90 soprano and played several others although not any II's. I've also talked with Dave Liebman about them. One thing he says is these are demanding horns and probably not ideal for part time players.
The palm keys are set very open making them hard to play on some setups. The front hi E/F came rather easy to me once I figured them out.What really worked for me was finding the right mouthpiece which in my case is a Selmer S-90 in a C* type opening. With this setup I am quite at ease at the top of the horn even at low volumes.
The other thing and its most important of all is this horn really requires firm diaphragm support to respond best, with good support the horn is a joy to play and without question the best soprano I've ever owned or played and that is many. The horn demands correct technique which can be a very good thing for its player.
 

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Non Resident SOTW Eccentric & 2012 Forum Contribut
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks all for your insights and input. I have some ideas that I will pursue and report on . The tone of the horn is soooo sweet and the ergos are just perfect for my hands.
 
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