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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I am a newbie in playing saxophone, starting last year.
A friend lent me his Yanagisawa, which he got from his wife as a birthday present "a couple of decades ago", as he said.
He played it for a couple of month's and sent it to rest until he gave it to me. (Actually he's a bassist.)
I eventually will buy it from him, but couldn't find any reliable information.
The serial number ist 00174052.
Here are the pictures.
Any help is appreciated.

Joachim.

Joachim.
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Serial puts it in 1992, plus the over-slung octave key with red logo and black bumper screws means it's probably a T900. That's a near mint specimen you've got there and an excellent horn. If it's anywhere near 2k USD, I would jump on that deal.

I have it's predecessor, the T880, and it rivals my Mark VI in terms of sound and over all quality.
 

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Have a look at the springs.
If they are silvery colored and not black/blueish and if the small screws on the pants protector and keyguards are silvery and not brass, then it is a T500, which is not as good and worth as much.
I cannot see it clearly in your pictures.

And I don‘t think that in our part of the world a T900 will cost nearly 2000€ in a private sale, more around 1600.
 

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I’d guess T5. It has plastic adjustment screws on the low B and Bb. If I remember right, the G # key was plastic too.
I like these older Yanagisawa saxes. They feel more like Selmers than anything else I’ve had. They don’t sound the same but they’re still better than a Yamaha.
 

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How does a T5 from 1966-1975 or a T500 from 1975-1985 end up with a serial number from 1992?

I agree my valuation is on the high side, but the condition is unusually good. A 30 year old horn in this condition is rare. That has to be worth a few hundred bucks.

@Joachim, can your friend nail down the year a little more accurately?
 

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It's a later T-50/T-500.

The T-800 and T-880 had the same bell-to-body brace and clothes guard but had double arms on the Low C and Low B.

The T-900 - which this is closest to in appearance - had Yanagisawa's modern 3-point bell-to-body and clothes guard.

In the USA, that would be a $1,500 - $2,000 horn given that it appears to be in pristine condition. On eBay, it's probably $1,000 - $1,500 on the assumption of needing new pads.
 

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How does a T5 from 1966-1975 or a T500 from 1975-1985 end up with a serial number from 1992?
It doesn’t...

It is a T 500 ( not a T5, different era and different horn ! ) , it was built contemporarily to the T800 series (hence the serial number confusion) the T 500, a good sax, was built with a number of money saving things , the Stainless Steel springs, often but not always, the Low Bb spatula is made of a brass painted plastic and the ribless construction. It is worth less than a T800 But it is a good horn. Because of the misidentification often people ask crazy prices for this model.
We regularly encounter it here BECAUSE of the serial number (but no model on the body) people come to ask.



“...
500 Series

The 500 series was Yanagisawa’s attempt to produce a beginner/intermediate horn. These were only available in alto and tenor. The series was introduced in the mid to late 1970’s and continued into the mid 1980’s. The typical way of identifying one of these is to look for the stainless steel springs used on the horn rather than the blued springs used on the higher end models of this time period...."

If one runs a search there are tons of threads on the T500

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi all,

thank you for your comments.
The sax has stainless steel springs.
I didn't check out the small screws on the pants protector yet.
BUT I was told that this saxophone is supposed to a 901, and this would, even if not true, raise the price significantly.
What should I do. Are there any very obvious features to identify it as NOT to be a 901?
And hence - what is it worth?

Joachim.
 

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Hi all,

thank you for your comments.
The sax has stainless steel springs.
I didn't check out the small screws on the pants protector yet.
BUT I was told that this saxophone is supposed to a 901, and this would, even if not true, raise the price significantly.
What should I do. Are there any very obvious features to identify it as NOT to be a 901?
And hence - what is it worth?

Joachim.
Certainly NOT a 901 ( the ring of the 901 is evidently different for example), this sax was contemporary with model 800, the 901 came much later.


Read the threads that I quoted above and you will see that you have a T500, the price is considerably lower than a T901 (generally stamped as such) around €1200 to €1500 yours is really nice looking

more on differences

 

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If the low Bb key is made of painted plastic, it's probably a T500. Non blued springs, single bell key arms, and also that black plastic spacer on the RH side key rods. I just sold a T500, and the buyer is convinced it's a T800, even though I pointed these things out. Very easy to misidentify these horns. My T500 played really well, it was a good horn.
 

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If the low Bb key is made of painted plastic, it's probably a T500. Non blued springs, single bell key arms, and also that black plastic spacer on the RH side key rods. I just sold a T500, and the buyer is convinced it's a T800, even though I pointed these things out.
Wishful thinking has no boundaries
 
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