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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to replace the rod in the lower stack on my chu tenor. there is way too much play in all the keys and I can see that its also in the post as well.yeah, I know its probably out of the relm of most DIY projects, but I have some tools, a lath, drummel, swedging, pliers and I am a realy good at tinkering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
actually, what I am not sure how to do is drill the keys to accept a larger rod, as far as cutting, tapping and sloting the rod, I don't think I will have a problem. most of what I know comes from seeing my horn being worked on by a repairman but, I've never seen the keys enlarged...
 

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newjazz said:
actually, what I am not sure how to do is drill the keys to accept a larger rod, as far as cutting, tapping and sloting the rod, I don't think I will have a problem. most of what I know comes from seeing my horn being worked on by a repairman but, I've never seen the keys enlarged...
Your response verified my thoughts and solidified my concerns here. This job is most definately NOT for a DIY project, for those reasons. If the instrument is of value, and you really want it to operate correctly, have it done by a qualified tech. You also have to determine which size drill rod you will need. These vary by .001. Acquiring them is another problem for the DIY. These keys will all require internal reaming (NOT drilling) and perhaps even swedging in certain over-worn areas. Lengthening the individual keys hinge tubing might also be required and thus considered in the above mentioned to complicate the situation more. Unless you are experienced and have the PROPER tooling to do ALL the above, don't try it. Then we can talk about hand-lapping the rods within the key tubes, and posts for proper fit, clean it all out, and then begin repadding the keys affected by those sloppy keys. :)
 

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I largely agree with Jerry.

However:

The inside of posts should NEVER wear, unless that pivot rod has been pivoting in the posts for a long time. There is no movement, so there should be no wear. "Fretting" is unlikely because the vibration forces are not severe enough.

It is more likely that there was play in the posts when the sax was originally made. (Student Yamahas, sadly, currently have a lot of play in the stack key posts.)

Do you have gear for accurately detecting whether there are significant worn areas on the rod. If the rods are not worn, then you have other options, although not quite as ideal...

- Swedge (etc) the hinge tubes to fit the rods.
- Swedge the hinge tubes or tweak the post alignment, to fit the tubes neatly between the posts.
- Bush the posts with superglue (lightly smearing the rod with grease first so the glue does not stick!!!) This is not appropriate if the diameter of the rod is not regular.

I've done this rebushing several times . Amazingly, it works. It just needs care replacing that rod through the rather firm bushings without damaging the bushings. (The bushings can be made less firm by judicious filing inside them. It probably pays to put a very slight round at the end of the rod.)
 
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