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I had my Dukoff D7 Super Power Chamber about 3 weeks ago from online shop. When it came, I realised that inside the chamber it isn't well finished. You can see the picture of my dukoff. I looked for a repairman who can help me with this but the repairman didn't recommend me to fix that because it could affect the reselling price in the future. He said the flawed part doesn't effect to the sound I produce. Is that true?
 

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I don't think the imperfections in the chamber would affect the sound. If on the baffle yes, but not the chamber. Someone more educated on the matter will shed more definitive light on this I'm sure.
 

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The mouthpiece looks fine to me. If youre talking about the scuff marks on the floor of the chamber then those should be purely cosmetic. Ultimately trying to clean them up would be pointless because as-is they shouldnt affect neither your sound nor the mouthpiece’s value.
 

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Thanks, but I still need more answer from someone more expert
You asked for opinions.
You received opinions.
You rejected opinions.

So why ask? It looks like you have already decided what the answer should be, and are looking for others to agree with you.
 

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And in a week we'll all have ANOTHER mouthpiece genius to send our mouthpieces to so they can get ruined. P
I've been making mouthpieces a very long time and you wouldn't believe what I've seen that played great. ...





many handmade or handfinished mouthpieces are not “ perfectly” looking.

The fact that this mouthpiece is not smoothly finished says absolutely nothing about how good it plays.

Mouthpieces making (especially if by hand) involves trying the mouthpiece, modifying as you go and stopping at some point.To know when and where to stop is the most important quality for a maker whom finishes things by hand.

Aside for looks is there anything that this mouthpiece does wrongly? Probably not.

There is NO reason why a smoother surface would have to work any better than a not so smooth one, same for many other things, there are perfect mouthpieces that don’t have perfectly symmetrical rails and still play wonderfully.

The idea that something “ perfect” looking plays better is simply in your mind.

Years ago someone that I know went to the Powell factory and tried several flute headjoints. They all played differently. He asked for the technician there to adjust them to play “ better” and possibly closer to one another.

The person played them, took some material off from different areas in different headjoints.

In the end they played much closer to one another.

The client asked what he had done and he said that he didn’t exactly knew it and told him that he did what his experience told him to do but that it was not an exact science and that you played and adjusted as you went.

Same things for mouthpieces.

By the way, just in case you wonder. Reeds are not symmetrical in thickness nor are they , necessarily, with the vamp being precisely in the middle and they determine the sound way more than a mouthpiece internal roughness.



I'd rather have a great playing mouthpiece than a great looking doorstop.
Some of my best sounding mouthpieces (ex. Barone, RPC, Lamberson) have been the least "pretty".

Are you gonna look at it or play it?

If the 'piece plays great, those imperfections become "beauty marks". That's how I've come to appreciate all the marks inside my Lamberson J7 - every one of them contributes something wonderful.

... I have a question, regarding to my recent purchase of the DV 7* mpc, which I found four lines of scratch marks on the surface of inner barrel of the mpc. Each line is about 1 inch long, starting from opening attached to sax neck.

Jody Jazz responded to my question, and commented it is unavoidable imperfection, due to the metal teeth groove during the mpc craft.
Ever seen a Lamberson? Very rough and lots of toolmarks inside but great tone on the outside. It just seems to be cosmetics. If it sounds good forget about it.
Ralph Morgan used to put scratches in his mouthpieces on purpose; he said that it helped to direct the air through the chamber. (Having to say "used to" in that sentence depresses me, by the way). Point is, the scratches are probably a good thing.
 

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I had my Dukoff D7 Super Power Chamber about 3 weeks ago from online shop. When it came, I realised that inside the chamber it isn't well finished. You can see the picture of my dukoff. I looked for a repairman who can help me with this but the repairman didn't recommend me to fix that because it could affect the reselling price in the future. He said the flawed part doesn't effect to the sound I produce. Is that true?
That actually looks better than a lot of vintage Dukoffs do. Smoothing it out in the throat area could affect the value for some buyers. Others do not care and some may actually prefer a cleaned up throat. Most of my tenor clients want me to remove the wart and enlarge the throat some to get a fatter more spread sound. The alto players are more 50/50 on this modification. These are players not collectors.
 

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so, some want it, some don’t, some don’t care either way
 
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