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The Conn looks like a standard low pitch "simple system" made from hard rubber. Good jazz "horn" (clarinets are not technically horns).

The other appears to be in the key "a" and made from good ole grenadilla wood. Clarinets in 'A' are not nearly as common as ones in Bb. Alas, it's a high pitched instrument common to the early 1900's. It won't be in tune with modern instruments of today.
 

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FWIW, I have a Conn hard-rubber Albert clarinet in Bb (low pitch). Not much more to say about it - it is what it is, and that would be useless to me. DAVE
 

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The high pitch Albert A clarinet would make a good wall mounting or lamp stand. The Bb clarinet, which dates from 1921, is of more value. However its value is very limited for two reasons: 1. Even though it is made to play at Low Pitch (which is essential), because it is an Albert system instrument, rather than a Boehm system, very few players today would want it. 2. Being made of ebonite rather than, say, African blackwood, and having no special, unusual features to the keywork, it would not be attractive to the cashed-up collector. As an Albert-system player I have several of these clarinets in varying stages of disrepair; I am always open to buying another at the right price for spare parts. If you, the OP, are an Albert-system player yourself, hang on to it: they are serviceable instruments.
 

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I acquired mine maybe 30 years ago, but I can't recall from where. At the time, I was enthralled with a local guy's Albert-clarinet playing (a wonderful mixture of Bechet, Dodds, and Lewis perfectly done) and I thought maybe I'd give the simple-system a whirl. I had the thing overhauled by a local clarinet-expert and after years of trying, I gave up on it and put it away.

After many years, I bought a new Yamaha German-System (quite similar to Albert but with more venting to enhance intonation) clarinet, but it, too just wasn't my bag, as they say. It has joined the Conn Albert in my collection of reed-instruments.

Like Mike T said, I could see no future in trying to sell the Conn Albert for what I had in it, so I was happy to keep it. It IS in good shape and very playable. I re-visit t from time to time, just for the fun of it. DAVE
 
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