Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to check out this horn regardless, but want to know I'm going in with the right information. The seller says its a 10m with an E450xx serial number (I"m assuming he meant 450,xxx?) I'm including some pics. It has an underslung octave mech, which to me would place it in the 60's, and thats conflicting with the serial number chart I found which would put this horn at around 55.

It looks nice in the pictures (possible re lacquer?)...the seller is asking just under $1000, which may or may not be fair. I just don't know enough about what determines the value of this vintage 10m, although I understand the later models with the underslung mech, and obviously no rolled tone holes make them less collectable hence, should sell for considerably less. Just trying to get some sense of what's generally fair for these before I go in for a play test. Many thanks!!

View attachment 29064 View attachment 29065 View attachment 29066
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
I'm going to check out this horn regardless, but want to know I'm going in with the right information. The seller says its a 10m with an E450xx serial number (I"m assuming he meant 450,xxx?) I'm including some pics. It has an underslung octave mech, which to me would place it in the 60's, and thats conflicting with the serial number chart I found which would put this horn at around 55.

It looks nice in the pictures (possible re lacquer?)...the seller is asking just under $1000, which may or may not be fair. I just don't know enough about what determines the value of this vintage 10m, although I understand the later models with the underslung mech, and obviously no rolled tone holes make them less collectable hence, should sell for considerably less. Just trying to get some sense of what's generally fair for these before I go in for a play test. Many thanks!!

View attachment 29064 View attachment 29065 View attachment 29066
I use the same 10M. It's a great horn, its hard to find information on it though! All I came up with is that mine was made in the 70's in Mexico, but man, I can't find another horn that sounds like it. I paid a several hundred for mine and haven't regretted it.

Hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Gotcha, I know this one is definitely an Elkhart IN made which is a good thing I understand is more consitent. How do you like your mexiconn?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
743 Posts
No, these were still made in Elkhart at the main factory. The late 6M and 10M saxophones of the 1950's ("Naked Lady) and 1960's (post-Naked Lady) are fine horns, and they play very well in tune with that classic fat Conn sound. I like them better than the '40's RTH models, and there are many here who agree. The lack of RTH is a good thing, IMO, but they sell relatively inexpensively because Conn started using nickel-plated keys in the '50's and continued that into the '60's. Because of nickel plated keys of the later King 600 series alto/tenors and the Selmer Bundys of the 1960's (and, let's be honest, the 1970's onward Yamaha YAS/YTS 21/23), most people assume that all nickel plated keys = student horns. This is NOT so, and the 1950's/1960's Conn 6M/10M are marvelous players. The tenor is worth every bit of the $1000 the OP mentioned if it is ready to play (and in original lacquer, if you care about such things).
Moderator SAXISMYAXE can chime in here with more specifics, as he owns Conns from every era. I reiterate, these are NOT MexiConns, but high quality Artist model saxophones, quite worthy of your attention.
Sax Magic
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Sax Magic!!, do you know if Conn stopped using grub screws on the later models as well? I've heard these can be problematic, but don't know that for a fact. Yes, the seller says he does not know when the last time it was adjusted or overhauled, except he's had it for a few years, and believes it is in playable condition.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
184 Posts
That looks like one cherry horn. Price looks a little higher than I'm used to seeing for 10Ms of the 1955+ era, but it's not the highest I've seen. You definitely want to be sure it's in top condition. Never heard of any real problem with grub screws. Some techs think they're not worth the extra fiddle compared with other means of securing pivot screws. They were discontinued to save manufacturing costs. I think the whole issue of whether the earlier or later 10Ms are better revolves around the player's style and setup.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
Joined
·
17,960 Posts
The late-model 10M's are killer horns. As already noted, ANY pre-1970 Artist series horn was still made at Elkhart. The 60's Artists retain the same design as the '50's ones as far as body design. They changed up the neck and octave key, keyguards and bellbrace, and tweaked some keywork a bit....but the body tube, bow, and bell are exactly the same as any other 10M.

If you are interested, anyone can visit my website and check some vidfiles of various 10M's I have there...same room, same recording equipment, same mouthpiece; just different 10M's. And the 60's versions stand up quite well to their earlier cousins.

I agree that these late ones are completely worth $1000; hell, they are worth $1200...BUT...their current market value is NOT $1000. These days, they range from around $650-900; the former being one with some wear, the latter being quite cherry. Absurdly low-priced, really.....I have one in the Marketplace now, very interesting horn in that it is one of the first with the underslung neck....and in 5 months on the market it never could fetch $1g. Crazy.

A mid-late 50's Lady-engraved one currently sells for around $1100-1200, a late 40's-early 50's non RTH for around $1300-1500, and a pre '48 RTH for about $1600-1900 or so.

That's a buyer's market if ever there was one.... because these current prices are a good 20-25% lower than what they were just two years ago...
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top