Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to purchase this one i have come across. I'd appreciate a quick response (sorry, believe me in very grateful) as the seller needs me to buy it tomorrow or ill miss it.
I don't know much about evaluating vintage saxes but i was hoping someone could help.

Its a 6M, from 1947 im pretty sure. 327XXX serial. Underslung octave, micro tuner on neck.

The seller bought it used but rebuilt 15 years ago, played it for a year, then locked it up. I have no way to try or see it in person before the sale, but i can probably get it under $500. Seller is not a pro but says that as far as he knows, it still works great, all keys move and return properly. Includes accessories.





 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
Discussion Starter #2




 

·
Banned
Joined
·
182 Posts
It's definitely been relacquered.. how does the seller want you to pay?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Columnist/Official SOTW Guru
Joined
·
3,764 Posts
Have you played it?

Do you want to play it?

Would it be cool just to "own" it?

It's hard to advise you based on a few photos, other than to second the advice given by Grumps.

As a player, beginner or pro, you don't want to ever buy a horn simply on make or model. Just because it looks like a 6M, doesn't mean it's going to play or sound like a 6M. And even if it does, what the Hell is a "Classic 6M sound" anyway? All that matters is how you sound on the horn and there's no law that says playing a 6M is gonna make you sound like any of the jazz greats who might also have played a 6M. Play the horn and play it again. Go back a week later and play it again.
If the guy selling is pressuring you to make a rash, or uninformed decision, walk away. Horns, like that woman accross the crowded bar, can often be "good from afar but far from good."
Do your homework. You should never chase a horn. Do your homework. Play a lot of different horns, and get a feel for what you like to play and sound good on. Once you get a liking for a certain horn, Do more homework and get to know what the market price is.
Then, "lie-in-wait."
When the horn you want does come up, you'll be in a far better position to judge its sound (is it better, same, or worse than other examples of the model?), it's condition (is it in mint, good, or poor condition compared with other examples currently available?) and ultimately, it's relative value.

If you're a collector, or now and then player, different story. All that matters, then is getting the right horn, in the right serial range, with the right finish and the right mint condition, at the right price. Piece of cake!;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,357 Posts
Dog Pants and Hersh are right. This is a relaq and not such a bargain that you should jump on it. It probably needs work too and maybe an overhaul. Now the cost of it has doubled.
Find a local teacher or working player who can help you pick out a horn, or buy from a repairman and or check with one first. Unless you know what to expect in potential repair costs you are flying blind on this. If you are just starting out you should just get a good used student model for awhile and not worry about vintage horns. And get a teacher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
It's impossible for me to play it before purchase as its in the US. I thought this looked like a huge bargain so i just wanted to check it out. I guess ill pass on it then.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top