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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I received a baritone today and I needs some work to be in good playing condition. I dont think it is anything serious, but it needs to be done ASAP and I cant afford 2 repair jobs right now and my soprano is already being tweaked by a tech. So, no time like the present to learn some stuff about sax repair, right?

I have a few problems, I will start at the top of the horn:

The Neck - It has been abused (not by me), how can I get this thing rounded out?



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"B" key - When I press down the "C" key, the "B" key also comes down, but it does not completely cover the tone hole when this happens, so I get a gurgle and not a note.



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Key height in Lower stack - The F key is too high it seems and it prevents the key directly above it from covering the tonehole at all, how can I adjust this?



Any information/advice is greatly appreciated!

THANKS!

~Zach
 

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What you call the "C" key, I will call the "A" key, because that is what it is.
What you call the B key, I will call the small C key, because it is the one you close to play C.

Put more thickness of cork (or whatever) in the linkage between them, or bend the A key (cup) up, relative to it's key-stop (linkage part), or bend the small C key up relative to its linkage arm. which one you do depends on a whole host of other things in the vicinity.

Likewise your linkage from F to F#. Add linkage cork thickness, or bend the F key cup up, or bend the F# linkage arm down, again depending on everything else.

Stack key adjustment is probably a lot more complicated than you imagine, unless you are happy with double action and squishy, unreliable linkage. You alter one thing, and it affects several others.

To highlight this, take a glance at the following, which actually only deals with a possible order, in order not to get in a big mess, rather than the how.

http://www.saxontheweb.net/vbulletin/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=507033

The fact that you needed to ask these questions possibly suggests that you should leave this work to a technician. Adjusting a sax needs a LOT of mechanical astuteness. But on the other hand, go for it.... That's what I did my first time. :)
 

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For your first problem, remove the cork, and use dent balls, mandrels, hammers etc - improvise - until the dents have gone. If one thing does not work, try another. You need suitable equipment at your disposal. Considering the severity, If the metal is already well work hardened, it may be necessary to anneal the metal, which CAN be a can of worms re the brazed seam along the neck.
Replacement is a possible option.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you very much for your help! I guess it is ore complicated than I thought, so I will have to do a little research before I try to do anything. I think I can handle the neck, that doesn't sound too difficult. Thanks again!
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
The fact that you needed to ask these questions possibly suggests that you should leave this work to a technician. Adjusting a sax needs a LOT of mechanical astuteness. But on the other hand, go for it.... That's what I did my first time. :)
Well, I have always wnated to learn more about how the horn works and I think it could be fun learning how to fix things, so I am just going to see what I can do on my own, just for fun.
 

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My first attempt at horn repair was a complete rebuild including key swedging.
I learnt a lot but i guess i spent about 120 hours on it till i got it right.
getting the key timing right is the most challenging because when you alter one thing it affects so many others.

don't rush anything just take your time and enjoy the journey. It's a long trip but the scenery is nice ;)

I still have a long way to go but then i keep stopping to smell the flowers
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, I did something wrong. I was tinkering around trying to see what I could do about the A key and I unscrewed that silver rod that hilds it in line, and now I doean't want to go back on, I can get it to go to the end of the fork F and then it gets stuck. Is it supposed to screw back in or are you supposed to kindo f force it down?
 

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DukeCity
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Do you have a really big hammer...?

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I saved it for you because when you post again it will make no sense :D


Zach,
you will have to make sure every thing is lined up correctly and that no springs are forcing the alignment apart. take time to have a good look at what you are trying to do and see what is stopping it DO NOT FORCE anything.
 

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saxymanzach said:
Well, I did something wrong. I was tinkering around trying to see what I could do about the A key and I unscrewed that silver rod that hilds it in line, and now I doean't want to go back on, I can get it to go to the end of the fork F and then it gets stuck. Is it supposed to screw back in or are you supposed to kindo f force it down?
You never force anything. If the pivot rod does not go back easily, then you have parts non-aligned, or you have damaged something.
 

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saxmanzach,if you live in PA or a state bordering PA and do not mind a drive pm me about my sax tech. He charges $10 to go over sax. Usually only $20 if it needs adjustment. He overhauled my Selmer USA alto and tenor for $275 each. He is really good.
 

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Ok, I found that the neck sounds fine the way it is (the notes that are playable sound very nice). I fixed the A key problem for the most part. Now, I am having problems with the lower stack. That one key above the F key will lose when I close the F, but when I press the E key it stays open. I really don't have enough patience to be a tech.
 

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saxymanzach said:
Now, I am having problems with the lower stack. That one key above the F key will lose when I close the F, but when I press the E key it stays open. I really don't have enough patience to be a tech.
Assuming you meant the F# key (and not the E key) doesn't close when you press E then most likely the E key is too low. Or maybe both F and F# are too high. Or this plus another problem.
 

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Follow the E key back to where it's key foot touches the bar that closes the key above the F key (this key is F# FYI) and use tape or glue a thin material between the key leg and the bar, increasing the thickness until the F# key closes all the way. I wouldn't bend anything if I were you, it's really easy to mess something up, especially on a bari with larger/more flexible keys.

-Scott
 

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saxymanzach said:
Ok, I found that the neck sounds fine the way it is (the notes that are playable sound very nice). I fixed the A key problem for the most part. Now, I am having problems with the lower stack. That one key above the F key will lose when I close the F, but when I press the E key it stays open. I really don't have enough patience to be a tech.
Use the same instructions that I gave for F & F#. This time it is E and F#.
If you are running out of patience already, forget being a tech.
 
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