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I visited my local music store, they had Pearl River,Jinbao,Cheteau and local brands.I was accompanied by a sax tutor.He played the Pearl river one and he advised me to buy that one.But I didn't like the sound of it,it was very crude not smooth maybe like marching tone or something.If I buy a good mouth piece and reed will the sound of the sax change or should I go for another one??Please advice :)
 

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Well, you were there with your sax Educator whom you, supposedly, trust.......otherwise you wouldn't have asked him . He played the saxophone , you listened and drew conclusions based on that...............now you want someone who wasn't there , who you don't necessarily trust as much as your educator to pass a judgement on something that they know nothing about ( how did that specific sax play, what kind of music would it be used for, how would you , one day, be able to play it.......... since obviously you cannot otherwise you would have played yourself). You need a clairvoyant! I think you should trust the expert advise of the educator that you chose to advise you, get yourself a good mouthpiece and good reeds and start studying and studying a lot.
 

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When you are a beginner, you have to trust the opinions of people like your instructor. If you had him/ her play test a few horns for you, I would assume that they picked out the best sax for beginning studies.

As you progress and begin to move toward your own sound concept, then you can go and upgrade your gear if you feel ot is needed. For now, either go with your teacher's pick, or get something that has good repuation as a student horn (yas-23 is pretty much the winner on here, and you won't NEED an upgrade for a long time).

Good luck to you!
 

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Though I (and most of us) are not familiar with those brands mentioned. I agree with Milandro. If it were me, I'd say none of the above, simply because I don't know anything about them. Your instructor, however, obviously approves (probably based more on quality of construction, than on tone). At this point, tone would be secondary anyway (it is between you and your Instructor, as to how to improve tone, starting with a good "generic" sounding sax). From there, you will know which way from the "middle" to go (bright, dark, centered, spread).

The same goes for mouthpieces and reeds. Must establish a "base" before veering off one way or the other. Your insructor should have put this across to you in one way or another.
 

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koda12345,

The good thing about marching bands, especially the large ones, is that you don't need to play loud at all meaning that the quality of the instrument isn't an important consideration. One fun thing I enjoy doing is visiting a showroom that sells or rents imported quality then softly as if talking to myself but the counter person can hear, "I don't see any Selmer Paris." Believe me they change their "tune" and become much more interested in conversation.
 

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I agree. Either get the one your teacher recommends, or the one you like. There isn't much point in asking us what will work best for you, after you've had the best advice already from someone who knows you and your playing and playing needs and has tried out the specific saxophones.

I don't know what you mean by a "marching tone".
 

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straight ahead?:bluewink: [rolleyes]
 

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My opinion on a "marching 'tone' " : Bright, loud, harsh, and brash. Lots of high range, little low range, limited overtones. 2 dimensional. But, that's just my opinion.
 

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I meant to say that the sound was loud harsh or more of bass? I guess.I think I'll buy the one my tutor recommends.I don't any thing about saxophones yet, does the sound depend upon the player?
 

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Yes, the sound depend a lot upon the player because most of the sound is formed by the player's oral cavity , throat, embouchure , reed and mouthpiece.
 

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well of course the horn has an influence but most players , to the audience, tend to sound pretty much as themselves (plus or minus some more or less accentuated nuances ) even on very different horns as Pete Thomas has proved many times with his many tests with radically different horns, yes sounding different, but still very similar because of him as a player. The thing is that you need to develop your playing and them you will also tend to develop a sound. It will take much time and after you are through the first hurdles you will probably start the search for a mouthpiece, reed, embouchure combination, once you are settled with one that satisfies you somehow (and some people stay searching throughout their playing career) you can work on building up a sound that will be a reflection of what you in your mind want to hear and will look for. This mental representation of the sound is the reference that your brain uses to direct your other bits and bobs to sound as close as possible to your idea of sound. Enjoy the ride, I hope you are in for the long one.
 

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Yes, the sound depend a lot upon the player because most of the sound is formed by the player's oral cavity , throat, embouchure , reed and mouthpiece.
Oh that's why, my tutor was in the army band so he played like that.I'll go with the pearl river one.
Yipes !!! N-n-nowww HOLD ON there, Buckaroos !

...if the SAME player played all three horns and IF one stuck out as having the worst tone....then that horn has the worst tone.

Comparatively speaking, it's not because of the player.

That horn design possesses the harshest tone, period. It may be more or less so under the mouth of another player, but it still will be that way.

(True ? I mean, if the teacher played the others and they sounded better to Koda, then...you cannot say that the COMPARATIVE tones are the result of the player...
One cannot say ONE horn sounded bad primarily because of the player, while the two other horns sounded good because of the player....)

Horns have their own intrinsic sound quality...you can alter it to a degree by player, mouthpiece, reed. But the horn is built and designed as it IS.
Sometimes you can slather lipstick on that pig...and sometimes, you cannot.
All I am saying is...should you choose that one, don't necessarily expect that its sound is going to become appealing under your own fingers....
 

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yes, the comparative tone is the horn............. but we don't know anything else about it and I think that the best judge of the situation is an EXPERT player (which the OP clearly is not) who was then and there
 

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Maybe the OP and the teacher just have different preferences when it comes to the sound of the sax.

And remember that what the teacher hears and feels differs quite a bit from what the OP only hears.
 
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