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Discussion Starter #1
I am referring to the part near the end of the Cadenza (Right before rehearsal number 22). How should I practice this? Going up isn't so bad, but going down from the F3, seems very difficult.

Also how do I trill a C-D in the third octave.
 

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If by third octave you mean before Altissimo, then use LH 2 for C key, keep it depressed, and trill with high Eb Key. (edited for "LH")
 

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Or if you just use the normal D key.. on some horns it doesn't make it too flat (I had no problem using the regular D fingering while holding the C key down)
 

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That works too, I should have mentioned that, thanks! I suppose it doesn't really matter for a trill, anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
what about the first question? thx btw.
 

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I haven't played it, but I would assume that grevsax's advice is sound. Just practice with a metronome at a much slower tempo, get it down perfect twice in a row, then speed it up about 10 bpm, play until you get it perfect twice in a row again, and repeat until you can actually play it faster than needed. (I find that the twice in a row part keeps flukes from happening)
 

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Play it at at least half tempo or even slower if it isn't absolutely perfect at half tempo. Once you find the SLOW tempo that you can just play it absolutely perfect without having to think about it.... play it like 5 times in that tempo. After you get it down, then crank up the metronome 2-3bpm. Rinse and Repeat.

It may sound a little tedious but guarantee you won't ever screw it up. The more strict you are with yourself the better you will be in the long run.
 

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Glazanov

Like all the other guys say, SLOW is the ONLY way to go.Technical problems of any kind are best sorted out that way>>>>>>>>not only on the saxophone !!
 

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One thing my teacher does... I used it for that section in the glaz... is kind of tedious... it really makes you think...

First, as everyone else says, slow it down. This technique gets very mindbogging and if you're trying to do it fast the first time through, it'll be pretty rough. I don't remember the notes, so let's just use a G Major scale for an example. 16th notes. So the highest number of notes you have in one group is 4. That will be the limit for this exercise. So you start out doing 2's. Play the scale G A, A B, B C, C D, etc. For the twos, you always go back to the last note you played. Next, group it in 3's. G A B, A B C, B C D, etc. For 3's always go back to the middle note of the set to begin the new one. Then finally do it in 4's... G A B C, A B C D, B C D E, etc.

This REALLY works your muscle memory, and if you can concentrate through it, is something that I've found to make things stick in your head forever. I did the Glaz a while ago, and I picked it up about 2 weeks ago, just to see what I still remembered from it, and that section didn't mess me up in the least.
 
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