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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hey all! New to the forum and I figured I'd use my platform (albeit however small) to educate you on Kaoru Abe, a fantastic free jazz player. I looked at the previous posts on this website and saw that his name was mentioned less than the number of fingers on the average saxophone player's hand(with at least two being "who tf is that???"), so wanted to show you perhaps my favorite saxophone player of all time. He and Eric Dolphy really influenced my musical upbringing, but Dolphy gets talked about a lot on here, so I figured I'd do my part and spread my knowledge about this niche subject.

Thanks all, and have a wonderful day!


 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is this your go-to pickup line?
Great because no has ever gotten it....
"On a scale of one to Kaoru Abe, how free are you tonight?"
I literally thought of it as I was making this account and I will absolutely be using it regularly in the future.

You are right though. I used it once with my coworker and she said "what are you talking about?" She took listening to it fairly well for about 10 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just getting back to the title of this thread heavy free jazz influences I would have to cite Evan Parker as my main influence when it comes to free playing. He's been mentioned often enough on SOTW but there's been no other player who resonates more than Evan with me. Having met him at a recording session at Maida Vale I asked him what he practiced and he replied that he didn't when it came to playing free. I liked that answer. I was heavily into free playing in my late teens (until earning a living became important) and played at a number of places where it was cool. Free playing had a big following in the UK in the 70's and a wealth of bands were out on tour during that period. I'm currently incorporating free playing into some of my recorded material here at home.
That's what I like about playing free- I don't ever "practice" playing freely, and I find the things I can't do in regular practice or reading I can do in playing free jazz. On my alto I'm lucky to hit the fourth overtone, but when I'm playing free jazz I regularly hit 6 or 7 overtones what I'm playing. It also allows me to experiment on instruments I don't get to play often- a played a baroque recorder the other day and loved it.

I just looked up Evan and see he's still kicking it. I hope he's passing on the same amount of knowledge to the new heads nowadays as he was back then.
 
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