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Hey Everyone,

I have inhereted a Haynes closed hole flute with the number 9394 on it. I was told only 10,000 of these , so presumably these are pretty valuable even though they are closed hole. It is in minty condition with original case.

Thanks,
Matt
 

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There are about 50,000 Haynes flutes. The closed hole standard (drawn) model was THE flute up until the 50s. The downside on yours would be that it is from the mid 20s and may not have rolled tone holes, may have theB shake rather than the Bb and has the 2 roller foot rather than the C# spatula. The last closed one I sold (about 4 months ago) was from 1937 and had the newer disign. I sold it fro $1,800 but had to take a flute in on partial payment It had about 2 year old pads, a new case and looked as new, no scratches or dings. On ebay they sell for about $1,100 to $2,000 for the standard model. Flute players don't relish these but they play great, just no fancy keys, open hole and no B-foot. These are very underrated and many sax players love them. If you send me a photo with some shots of the pads and any worn places, I can give you more info.
 

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I have a 1942 (17xxx) closed hole haynes that plays beautifully. It has rolled tone holes and is pitched at 440, (so flute players and haynes afficianados tell me), but it has the B shaker (not Bb) and the two roller foot mechanism. I actually really like the two roller system on the foot, it can really help to create good hand position and to not be reliant on your right pinky for holding the flute correctly.
The response of these flutes can be somewhat different to modern flute, but with perseverance I think the sound can be better (depending on what you're after).
 

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I have to ask.

What's a B shaker?
 

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Basically a trill key. It is the little button above the F key that closes the Bb pad on most flutes. On the older ones, it closes the B thumb pad thus a B shake rather than the modern Bb shake. Flute players use this and the thumb Bb all of the time. I never use them. I am building some flutes with a bis key for us sax players.
 

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While we're discussing Haynes flutes

I too have an 17xxx Haynes flute that I really like, and without taking this off topic or hijacking this thread, I was wondering (Bruce and others) if there is an after market headjoint available that would help the tone and response.

Thanks.
 

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Most of these are rather heavy (dark resistant sound) flutes about .018 or .020". That helps give them the dark rich sound down low that sax players like. The older ones tend to have a riser (the part between the lip and the head tube) that is a bit short which tends to NOT help the low end. The blow holes are usually pretty large, about 12+mmL x 10.5mmW. Today we go about 11.8L and as small as 10.2W. Changing the lip ad riser is not a good idea. Any modern head joint should be OK on these but I would stick with one .014" thick or more. I have put one on my heads (.014") with a gold riser and it improves the flute quite a bit BUT it is $900 wholesale which negates any advantage for the price of the Haynes. Look for used heads such as a Yamaha EC, Emerson American cut, modern Haynes, Powell or whatever comes along. Avoid Gemeinhard, Armstrong, Selmer, etc.
 

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bruce bailey said:
There are about 50,000 Haynes flutes. The closed hole standard (drawn) model was THE flute up until the 50s. The downside on yours would be that it is from the mid 20s and may not have rolled tone holes, may have theB shake rather than the Bb and has the 2 roller foot rather than the C# spatula. The last closed one I sold (about 4 months ago) was from 1937 and had the newer disign....
I had Haynes #6651, with Bb shake and C# spatula, and rolled tone holes. I think the earlier design ended in the 4000's or so.

There is a chance that it is A=435, which is a bit low for some modern tunings (some orchestras tune to A = 444).

Toby
 

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I forgot to add- I paid about AUD$1300 for mine, then got it overhauled and bought a new mateki case. All up I had a great flute for less than $3000.
 
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