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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm noticing that I'm able to tongue scales more easily than triads. It's like my air falls apart or something. Is it typically more difficult to articulate larger intervals? It shouldn't be, but for some reason my air, or something, just falls apart. Anyone else run into similar issues? If so, what did work on to get past it, anything specific? Or, did you just shed triads/7th chords/etc until it was smooth?
 

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I may be nieve, you are playing years longer than me , but try to stop using your tongue, just use your breathing to articulate, the bottom of your lungs never let them get half empty and you will have the air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I may be nieve, you are playing years longer than me , but try to stop using your tongue, just use your breathing to articulate, the bottom of your lungs never let them get half empty and you will have the air.
I'm specifically shedding tonguing.
 

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More finger and pad movement can leak air between notes.
Get the arps smooth with synchronous finger movement without articulation first.
Start slow then speed up.
Be aware of inadvertent out time sequences.
Add articulation.
 

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The actual notes you’re playing should have zero impact upon your ability to accurately touch the tip of your tongue to the reed to temporarily disrupt vibration.
 

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Get the Joe Viola book on scales. Go slowly, and tongue every note. That will fix you up in a couple months easy.

Frankly, what you say sounds like a tongue-fingers-air coordination issue. Just play slowly until you can play it perfectly, then slowly speed up.
 

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Get the Joe Viola book on scales. Go slowly, and tongue every note. That will fix you up in a couple months easy.

Frankly, what you say sounds like a tongue-fingers-air coordination issue. Just play slowly until you can play it perfectly, then slowly speed up.
+1
 

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Regarding the smoothness of the arpeggios, I would probably include slurring them, slowly, making sure my movements between notes is precise. Then I would add the tongue.
 

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+2

Whenever I've run into this issue when working on a new skill or articulation, it works for me. I get impatient because I master one thing, get to a performance-level tempo, then start working on something new and I just don't want to slow it down. Slowing down the tempo and taking the time to be deliberate has worked for me every time, but it takes longer. Which I don't like, because I'm impatient. (And we all generally know it, I teach it to my kids. Just don't make me do it... :mrgreen:) And I record myself....the recordings don't lie.

G' luck!
 

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I'm noticing that I'm able to tongue scales more easily than triads. It's like my air falls apart or something. Is it typically more difficult to articulate larger intervals?
I don't see why tonguing triads or arpeggios should be any more difficult than tonguing scales. The only difference is you are playing maj & min 3rds instead of scale degrees. 3rds are not very large intervals. It's true that some larger intervals (4ths & larger) might present a problem, but it's more common to have an issue when slurring large intervals (which is why slurring them is good practice) rather than tonguing them; I find that when I play a large interval (say a 7th or octave) that the second note speaks more easily if I tongue it.

So I don't quite understand what's going on in your case. Maybe it's an air stream issue or more likely you are doing something wrong in the way you are tonguing notes. Or both. I would first work on slurring the arpeggios, then gradually add a light tonguing action. Try to keep your air stream steady as you tongue the notes.
 

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I like to practice slowly alternating between two notes of an interval each day. Like start your day by playing B -> D over and over slowly. In different octaves. At different dynamics. Tonguing, not tonguing. Keeping air moving...

The next day do B -> D#... or whatever. Until things get comfy. Hope that helps.
 
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