Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just curious. I've thanked the teacher who started me on piano when I was five, and my college voice professor. A couple of students from years back have thanked me. I wish I knew where more of my old teachers were, and I'd thank more of them. Think how different the world we be without music teachers. I love these talented, generous people!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
957 Posts
I looked up one of my old instructors and found out he had died. I intended to thank him and I was shocked and saddened by the news.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,580 Posts
If I had one worth thanking, sure. To be honest, I came up in the public school system and had basically zero guidance and was left to my own devices on how to play saxophone. As you might expect, I taught myself completely wrong. I don't blame them, they were (and I'm sure still completely are) overburdened with things to accomplish to really pay attention to kids one-on-one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
I'm facebook friends with some of my favorite teachers, I've definitely thanked them. My original band teachers family were our next door neighbors, so we knew them quite well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,073 Posts
Through the magic of Facebook I have contacted almost all of my old private teachers and band directors. The only one I cannot find is my first band director. :-/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I thanked my teacher by inviting her to dinner and a back stage pass to personally meet David Sanborn (1987). I still have the photos of us all remembering this great evening! Many years have gone by and we lost touch. Sadly I believe she has passed! You don’t forget those who cared! Thank you Evelyn!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
15,957 Posts
I have thanked my former saxophone teacher many times over the years. We remain friends and stay in contact with frequent and lengthy phone visits. We have worked together on several gigs as well. I and several other of his students financed his recording a CD for his kids and grandkids a few years back. We've known each other for over 55 years now. He's 78, I'm 72. Best teacher I ever had for any subject.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Luckily I had the good opportunity to thank Ornette Coleman for showing me the "Double Lip" Embouchure when I was younger. I still use it on certain ballads for a nice mellow tone. Also when I see players and students that have read and learned from my book they usually smile and say "Easy Easy Bebop".
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member/, Official SOTW Sister
Joined
·
19,221 Posts
I see my former teacher every Thursday evening.
He's one of my oldest, and dearest friends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
My teacher retired recently at age 85. His eye sight was failing and gave up teaching. I went for his 85th birthday party and thanked him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
My junior high school band teacher was amazing. I looked him up a couple years ago and it gave me the opportunity to thank him.

He was the first person outside of my immediate family (and my Little League coach) to really show a real belief in me. He took a special interest in two of us 7th graders at the time and nominated us for All City auditions. Apparently kids our age typically did not get to audition.

We both made it and he took us for a ride in a small rented plane and we had lunch.

Honestly was a big moment in my life. To have someone show that kind of faith in my abilities, to get the challenging material to practice and audition in front of all the other kids we were competing against and to actually make it into the All City Orchestra, Band and Jazz ensembles over the junior and senior high years were defining moments for me.

He mentioned that he was having a discussion with his wife and was ruminating on the fact that he would probably not be able to do that kind of thing in this day and age. We got lucky.

I’m grateful for how he impacted my life and that I had the chance to express my gratitude.

Unfortunately his successor was kind of a jerk but that was unimportant in the long run.

I lucked out in High school and had two excellent band/jazz lab directors.

Hats off to those who shape young lives.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,496 Posts
I had contacted my private lessons teacher from when I was in high school, and it was so great to reconnect!
He came over my house every week for over two years, and had a huge influence on me. The coolest thing for me was that I told him about my mouthpiece line, and he was blown away, because he uses a Robusto hard rubber!!! He said he had no idea that was me. It made me feel so good to hear that. Now that we are back in touch, we will stay in touch. He was so appreciative to hear about what a positive influence he was on my life.

I recommend everyone reach out and say thank you to those who have made a difference in your lives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
I tried to find my first teacher (Red Hamilton) but could not. He was inspiring and not just as a musician.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Every chance I get to thank a teacher that has made an impact on my life, I take. It is such an underappreciated career and nothing beats a good, inspiring, motivating teacher. They truly leave a lasting mark on you. My high school band director was one of the most impactful people on my life and he was actually nominated for a Grammy this year for his dedication as a band director. So take the I'm and thank your teachers and mentors!

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,633 Posts
If I had one worth thanking, sure. To be honest, I came up in the public school system and had basically zero guidance and was left to my own devices on how to play saxophone. As you might expect, I taught myself completely wrong. I don't blame them, they were (and I'm sure still completely are) overburdened with things to accomplish to really pay attention to kids one-on-one.
I'm exactly in line with Buddy, with one exception... But the exception was my grade school band director, and thus not in a position to really impact my playing, as I had no idea what good music was at that age, nor any real interest in playing clarinet.*
Nor did I have any idea who he was, which was the top reed man in town at that time (1960s).

*I had asked if I could play Fender bass but was told "You can't play that but you'll make a good clarinet player". I'm still not sure clarinet is a worthwhile pursuit!

In junior high, the extent of beneficial study was that we had a "stage band" that met after school a few days a week, playing In The Mood and stuff... In high school, it got really bad, as the focus was Marching Band (!), with the rest of the time devoted to the "concert band". Totally square, and I quit after 11th grade.

I never got any private lessons until I paid for them on my own, after I got out of high school. Even then, I simply went to the music store and said "I need lessons" and ended up with two or three different old guys who were just readers... "Take this home, practice reading it, and come back next week and play it back to me". Lame etudes and stuff, and no sense of sax to where they could have pointed out that my tone sounded like @$$. I still didn't know that my first band director was the guy I should have looked up.

Time went on, I could never figure out how the guys I admired (Bird, Coltrane, Dolphy, Getz...) did what they did, and when I found myself with a family, a mortgage, a day job, and going to night school, I put the horn down. By then, I knew through my uncle, who was one of the top local trumpet men for many years, what a great player my former teacher was. But when I was in "band class" in 5th and 6th grades, I only remember him drinking black coffee and looking as though he had a splitting headache while listening to all the "pet shop on fire" sounds.

So when I got playing again ten years ago, and finally figured out how things work, got a good setup, etc., I went and looked up my old band director, even though I never took advantage of his knowledge, since he was relegated by lack of seniority to the grade school gig. As it turned out, he was still playing, and as we really got to know each other, he's become a great friend and mentor. He was knocked out by Lester Young as a young man and that is what made music his lifelong pursuit. He's now 90 years old and still playing (!) and I love getting together with him, spinning old Prez sides (on my iPad), Getz Zoot, Al Cohn, Sal Nistico, etc. and listening to great stories of the old days and the great players.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I loved all your stories. It made me think of my dear Mrs. Colberg, who taught me piano for many years. I would tell her about my week while I played my pieces, and we would giggle like high school girls over the funny parts. She cared about her students, and liked their different personalities, and the way that uniqueness came out in their playing styles. She served the strongest coffee ever, and my long-suffering dad accepted a cup every time to be polite. I can only imagine the sleepless nights he had on Thursdays...

I can think of other teachers who taught me more musical expertise, but I can't think of any teacher who was more fun, interested or caring. We were definitely on the same wavelength. I kept in contact with her until she passed on. I hope to see her again someday after I join her on the other side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,538 Posts
I have had all amazing teachers (with one notably horrific exception)- the first was a piano teacher who had two baby grands in her living room, Mrs. Rieger. She taught me the circle of fifths and cadences- and I had to write everything out by hand with real staff paper- no music software! She wore those glasses that went down to the end of her nose and used one of those old metronomes. She passed away before I could thank her:cry: . When my dad died and we couldn't afford lessons, she let me study for free.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
I quit looking up people from way back. Most are gone, many prematurely.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top