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Born the 4th of July in 1907, Santy Runyon would grow up to totally revolutionize mouthpieces and shape the growth of the saxophone and jazz throughout the 20th century. He was a pivotal figure in the growth and development of the instrument. (Along with people like Brilhart, Guardala, and Otto).

He was also an exceptionally kind individual who really cared about the products he was making.

Though he died over 10 years ago, I strongly believe that anyone who really makes music, and plays jazz today, owes him a debt of gratitude. So many of "the jazz greats" that may (or may not) have influenced your sound have used his mouthpieces. Hopefully we can all agree that his mouthpieces were used to make beautiful music. Many of them still represent an incredible value to both the professional player and the student alike.

Everyone has a sax player they look up to, a sound there going for, or at least someone they respect who came before them. And often somewhere up the food chain of inspiration lies a runyon mouthpiece.

Happy birthday Mr.Runyon.

BTW: I know i'm a few days late. Please forgive me.
 

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Santy Runyon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Clinton "Santy" Runyon (July 4, 1907 – April 4, 2003) was an American saxophonist and flautist as well as a designer and manufacturer of mouthpieces for woodwind instruments.

Runyon's career included, among other things, playing at Al Capone's speakeasy club, The Coliseum, and giving lessons to many musicians, including the likes of Charlie Parker.

Early career

He began as a "trap" drummer in the pit of his father's movie house. Runyon would play percussion and supply sound effects for the silent films. He also learned to play the marimba and the vibes and eventually found the instruments that would be the passion of his life: the woodwinds.

Runyon studied music at Oklahoma A&M and the University of Missouri before hitting the road as a traveling musician. He played saxophone with the Benny Maroff, Johnny Green and Henry Busse bands. As a member of the Busse group, at age 25, Runyon created the jazz shuffle beat showcased in Busse's hit recording "Hot Lips".[citation needed]

In 1933, Runyon began an 11-year stint as lead flute player with the Chicago Theater Orchestra. and on Saturday nights, he played The Coliseum, a speakeasy owned by the infamous gangland legend, "Scarface" Al Capone. At the Chicago Theater, he worked with Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Edger Bergen, Betty Gable and other show business notables. He even did a running comedy bit with Jack Benny. Between radio, clubs, and the theater, Runyon weathered the Great Depression pretty well, earning $150 a week while many men were taking home $8 or $9 a week.

Teaching

Santy Runyon and Frank Anglund, lead trumpet with the Chicago Theater Orchestra, opened the Runyon Studio. Through those doors passed such jazz legends as Charlie "Bird" Parker, Paul Desmond, Harry Carney, Lee Konitz, and Sonny Stitt. Runyon had students in most of the big bands of the era, inclluding those of Benny Goodman, Count Bassie, Cab Calloway, and Duke Ellington. When Lawrence Welk began his long-running television show, five of his saxophone players were Runyon alumni.

Mouthpiece design

In 1941, Runyon sold his first mouthpiece, a variation of the 1918 curved device he had fabricated with chewing gum. A metal model built for an Army band member resulted in an order for thousands of mouthpieces. A manufacturer refused the order and he began manufacturing mouthpieces in Chicago, but moved to Beaumont, Texas, in 1960 and continued to play professionally at the Petroleum Club there. He married and had five daughters, most of whom live across the Southeast Texas area. Runyon moved to Lafayette, Louisiana in 1970 and began playing at Toby's and also opened a manufacturing facility on Lewisburg Road in Opelousas.
 

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Santy Runyon
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Clinton "Santy" Runyon (July 4, 1907 – April 4, 2003) was an American saxophonist and flautist as well as a designer and manufacturer of mouthpieces for woodwind instruments.

Runyon's career included, among other things, playing at Al Capone's speakeasy club, The Coliseum, and giving lessons to many musicians, including the likes of Charlie Parker.

Early career

He began as a "trap" drummer in the pit of his father's movie house. Runyon would play percussion and supply sound effects for the silent films. He also learned to play the marimba and the vibes and eventually found the instruments that would be the passion of his life: the woodwinds.

Runyon studied music at Oklahoma A&M and the University of Missouri before hitting the road as a traveling musician. He played saxophone with the Benny Maroff, Johnny Green and Henry Busse bands. As a member of the Busse group, at age 25, Runyon created the jazz shuffle beat showcased in Busse's hit recording "Hot Lips".[citation needed]

In 1933, Runyon began an 11-year stint as lead flute player with the Chicago Theater Orchestra. and on Saturday nights, he played The Coliseum, a speakeasy owned by the infamous gangland legend, "Scarface" Al Capone. At the Chicago Theater, he worked with Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, Edger Bergen, Betty Gable and other show business notables. He even did a running comedy bit with Jack Benny. Between radio, clubs, and the theater, Runyon weathered the Great Depression pretty well, earning $150 a week while many men were taking home $8 or $9 a week.

Teaching

Santy Runyon and Frank Anglund, lead trumpet with the Chicago Theater Orchestra, opened the Runyon Studio. Through those doors passed such jazz legends as Charlie "Bird" Parker, Paul Desmond, Harry Carney, Lee Konitz, and Sonny Stitt. Runyon had students in most of the big bands of the era, inclluding those of Benny Goodman, Count Bassie, Cab Calloway, and Duke Ellington. When Lawrence Welk began his long-running television show, five of his saxophone players were Runyon alumni.

Mouthpiece design

In 1941, Runyon sold his first mouthpiece, a variation of the 1918 curved device he had fabricated with chewing gum. A metal model built for an Army band member resulted in an order for thousands of mouthpieces. A manufacturer refused the order and he began manufacturing mouthpieces in Chicago, but moved to Beaumont, Texas, in 1960 and continued to play professionally at the Petroleum Club there. He married and had five daughters, most of whom live across the Southeast Texas area. Runyon moved to Lafayette, Louisiana in 1970 and began playing at Toby's and also opened a manufacturing facility on Lewisburg Road in Opelousas.
Happy Bday to this icon in the music field as a performer, teacher and moutjpiece guru/manufactuter!
 
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