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Discussion Starter #1
Scored this King last month. I found it in Colorado off if Craigslist two years ago. I contacted the seller and told him what I usually buy these for (He had $500 on it) and to keep me in mind if it didn't sell. He saw one of my youtube vids comparing mouthpieces I uploaded in November, then contacted me stating that he wanted me to be the one to restore his horn. He sold it to me at my usual buy price and off we go.

I write that it is a 1913 but that is the best estimate from the known serial numbers. If they made 50,000 from 1897-1916 and this one is 3/4th the way through....I just put 1913 on there and call it a day. Whatever year, it's over a 100 years old now. No quibbling over a few years at this point.

I have it broken down and as usual there is always one smart *** rod that is stuck. I've heated it and WD-40 it....I'll let it soak over night and hit it again tomorrow to see if it penetrated.....but to be honest, when you get in this situation, it's best to leave the hinge rod in there and just clean around that one key and slide a new pad in there during the rebuild. There are all sorts of ways but you are now getting into heating post off the horn. If it pivots fine, and the key doesn't need bending or rebuilding, just slide a new pad in there and regulate it and call it good.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
The bell etching shined up really nice, I anticipate the rest of the silver plate to be just as nice....there isn't a dent in this body despite not having a case.

Oh, the seller in Colorado bought it in a yard sale in 2004. THOSE prior owners had it as a wall decoration for years but how long isn't known.

Cleaned the mouthpiece, but it has no markings on it so I have no clue who made it. I tried it out on my Buescher TT with a Black Onyx reed from Fibrereed. I bought the reed on Friday at the NAMM show. The Black Onyx medium is sooooo smooth and forgiving.....you guys have to try one. I'll post something about the Black Onyx in another thread. I was sold on the Carbon Fiber from Fibrereed, but the "one upped" themselves with the Black Onyx
 

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Yes this is an early C Mel.
The later ones do not spell out "Cleveland, Ohio " on the engraving.
I have the same horn [ see my albums in Profile] . What is the serial # ????

My understanding is they made these till 1924.
I come in at # 34072 so I guess mine is in the middle of the production run of 50000

I will be following your footsteps and re doing this as my first overhaul this summer.
I also have the New Wonder C mel. that is in better shape and I love it.

Post photo of the mouthpiece , and serial # please.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes this is an early C Mel.
The later ones do not spell out "Cleveland, Ohio " on the engraving.
I have the same horn [ see my albums in Profile] . What is the serial # ????

My understanding is they made these till 1924.
I come in at # 34072 so I guess mine is in the middle of the production run of 50000

I will be following your footsteps and re doing this as my first overhaul this summer.
I also have the New Wonder C mel. that is in better shape and I love it.

Post photo of the mouthpiece , and serial # please.
34113 is the serial of this one, so ours was made ~two weeks apart from each other. And yes, judging by the run and the known serial numbers for that time period, Mid to mid-late or 65% into the years??? That's where I come up with 1913 from.

As far as the build, I was just getting down to cleaning the keys, I got about four pieces cleaned and an un-expected visit from a lady friend interrupted me last evening. Tonight is band practice.....so...another delay for the cleaning process. Tarnex and surgical gloves await. We have rain coming, so I have to hurry and get some Hagerty's on it to keep it from tarnishing. The Tarnex leaves them so raw that exposed silver (w/o tarnish inhibitor aka light wax) they start to turn black on you.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm getting confused now as I was questioning your dates.....I may have been on another Sax, but I "thought" I had a 1898-1916 serial run on this model but I can't find where I saw that before....I'm still looking to try to find where I got that from.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
^^After you posted your years....and I re-researched, You can't trace H.N. White back any further than 1900-1905ish time frame. So, as you stated there were 50,000 units and ours falls 1915-1916 time frame
From Horn-u-copia
Early instruments have a lion's head near the serial numbers and marked The King.
Before 1918 the engraving read simply as "H. N. White."
In 1918 the company was incorporated and "Co" was added to the engraving.,
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Update: So, Little jack-***** finally gave up the fight. I didn't get a chance to touch this project.....Monday, I had a Pyrex dish out, Tarnex, toothbrush and rubber gloves....I got three keys cleaned when an unexpected female friend came over, Tuesday was band practice, Wednesday was date night and so finally Thursday night I have a chance to test the WD-40 soak.

It came loose with just a little bit of back and forth action. The whole body is now stripped of all keys and hardware and ready to be tarnex cleaned. It's already 9pm so, just gonna put this off till Tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Half way cleaned up.

MOST of the body is polished, You can see on the left side toward the neck how dull it looks.....this is the way it is after removing the tarnish with Tarn-X. You have to come behind and use a Hagarty's or some other silver polish.

"Some" of the keys are done.

I had run out of "Magic Erasure" sponges, if I hadn't I think I would have been done by now, I was using a toothbrush on the keys before I realized how much time I was wasting and ran to the Home Depot and got more magic erasure sponges. This cleaning is by far the most tedious and time consuming part of the rebuild. Cleaning all the keys and the body, inside and out may take the better part of 8 hours straight.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
After "HOURS" of Tarn-X, followed by Hagarty's, here is the point where you can decide to build or have parts re-plated. I'm anxious to 'hear' this King as I've never owned one. I'll start placing new pads in it this morning. I 'should' be able to be regulating and placing new cork pieces during the Superbowl this afternoon. We'll see (funny how the picture shows the middle of the body looking dull, it's just lighting as that area looks as polished as the rest)
 

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While it's also based on educated guesses, there's a serial chart at the start of this attempt at cataloging King's Cornet and Trumpet models that seems to be fairly accurate to all that I've seen: https://www.trumpet-history.com/Early King Models.pdf
If that's all correct, your horn would be about 1920, which would go with the 1918 change to having Co. after H.N. White. (although I'd then wonder where all of the earlier horns are from 1918-20.)
Also, here's a C-Mel rather like yours, but with Ohio just abbreviated as O.: https://www.saxophone.org/museum/saxophones/specimen/1178

Cool horn, regardless!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
It's starting to get there.....As I got up to the top I noticed something I hadn't seen up to this point. The Spring had broken clean off on this post for the Octave mechanism.....of course that took most of the time digging that one out. Luckily I had some NOS blue springs in my parts bin.
 
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