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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I picked this up awhile ago and just getting to it... It plays just needs a few pads replaced. It has rolled tone holes. I can find very little information on this manufacturer so any information is appreciated.
 

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Conn New Wonder series one made between 1919-25. these are fine sopranos. It appears to have been lacquered somewhere along the line as lacquer was not used back then but from the photos it may be bare brass. If so, those white pads could be the originals.
 

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not all saxophones which had bevelled toneholes were Martin ( actually several brands used them!)

this particular example below is only used to illustrate this fact.

If the horn above is a Lyon & Healey/ Couturier it is a slightly different model than this (this one has 4 left palm keys which the horn above hasn’t but there ar e shuch horns also with regular left palm keys , see first photo)



Anyway, read this





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Even Buescher toyed with Bevelled tone holes (albeit briefly) - but - none moreso than Martin, and this is where I am placing my money!
 

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well, this is another (unfortunately small pic) Lyon & Healey which looks like the twin brother of op’s


Unfortunately member La Porte, who would have certainly know, no longer frequents the forum
 

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It's pretty hard to identify sopranos from photographs, as all those 1920s-1930s sopranos are so similar in keywork. Someone who is personally familiar with a bunch of them, seeing the thing in person, is probably the only way to get a real positive identification. It might even come down to things like the type of pivot screws, which of course you have to pull to see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you everyone for the insight on this and sorry for the late reply I was traveling this week. I was able to find this link of a pdf that outlines the Harry B. Jay company history. It talks about all their brass instruments but no reference to saxophones.


I am going to keep looking.
 

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