Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
SOTW Interviews/Editor, Distinguished SOTW Member,
Joined
·
1,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While putting together the "Blues, R&B, Rock n' Roll Teaching Resource", we fell into a discussion about what were the great sax solos. Sax Gordon (http://www.saxgordon.com/) named Sam The Man Taylor on Nappy Brown's "Don't Be Angry".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=agCjrZFSnvc

John Laughter's terrific resource (http://cafesaxophone.com/showthread...5-2005-by-John-Laughter-amp-Steve-D.-Marshall) notes Sax Gordon's identification of Sam The Man and that King Curtis and Al Sears also played on the album.

An alternative cut has appeared on YouTube,. I checked with Roy Simonds who did the wonderfully comprehensive discography on King Curtis (http://forum.saxontheweb.net/archive/index.php/t-114771.html) and he wrote that he also thought it was Sam The Man Taylor on the original take and not King Curtis. He also thought that the alternative track was not something from the same session but a re-cut with neither Sam the Man nor King Curtis on the solo.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LQZuKNz1NA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,862 Posts
yes the original has Sam's "more agressive" tone rather than KC's and the piece at 1:14 on is classic Sam the Man. the alternate take, who knows, doesn't sound like Sam nor King.
 

·
SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014, Disti
Joined
·
2,890 Posts
"DON’T BE ANGRY"-NAPPY BROWN-BUDD JOHNSON-TENOR
L.P. credits AL SEARS, SAM TAYLOR, KING CURTIS (tenor saxophone); BUDD JOHNSON (baritone saxophone). Per Stuart Colman-Budd Johnson takes the solo on “Don't Be Angry” by Nappy Brown.
 

·
SOTW Interviews/Editor, Distinguished SOTW Member,
Joined
·
1,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Budd Johnson takes the solo? That is a surprise and the first time I've heard it suggested, unless I'm misreading the post and you're referring to the alternate take.

To me, that sure sounds like Sam The Man on the original. As I understand it, Sam had been in another studio, happened to walk into this recording session, and took the solo.

I checked out Budd Johnson on tenor on Youtube and found these tracks from 1960 and 1959. To me the tone and phrasing are different, but what do you think?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyygevPXaqU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEpcejG23rw&feature=related
 

·
SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014, Disti
Joined
·
2,890 Posts
To me the tone and phrasing are different, but what do you think?
Neil, I agree about the tone and style.

I have questioned a fair amount of the input that I have received since 1999 when the project was started.

Stuart Colman has been a tremendous help over the years with the early history. When these individuals sent an email I included it in the CD book and have left it up to others to question. In some cases I have been given reasonable proof or explanations while other cases remain unresolved.

What I keep in mind (not in the Nappy Brown case) is that some solos may have been intentionally done in a way that was not in keeping with the session sax players style. The producer in some cases encouraged the sax player to alter his style during the sessions. This was allegedly suggested when Pat Boone recorded the Little Richard hits. It has been documented that the producer told the tenor player to stop playing "so nice" and make it more rock & roll.

As for Nappy Brown, I can't disagree. I just added the information that I received. However, I believe that I will add footnote in the book to locate the Johnson solos on Youtube and compare them to Taylor. Thanks.
 

·
SOTW Interviews/Editor, Distinguished SOTW Member,
Joined
·
1,194 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds like a reasonable solution! Thanks John.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,862 Posts
I dunno. I've heard Sam play that same lick(1:14) on another tune, and it sounds like Sam, Why if you have Sam in the room ask another player to sound like Sam? I'll see if I can find that tune for comparison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
All: That has to be Sam The Man Taylor on the original Don't Be Angry. The "tell" is/are certain phrases/idiosyncratic licks that Taylor also used in his solo on the 1954 Sh' Boom by the Chords. Listen to both solos and you'll not only hear the huge trademark tone, but you'll also hear common ideas/phrases in the solos.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top