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I recently finished the book "Music, the Brain and Ecstasy" (http://tinyurl.com/2et7gd). Actually, I read it twice, it was such an informative and interesting read about how humans process music. I highly recommend it to anyone that loves music.

Does anyone else have any recommendation for books about music? Bio's, history, science, etc. I'm looking to expand my library.
 

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Interesting you should ask this question! I just read the fascinating new book by neurologist Oliver Sacks: Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain. Highly recommended!
 

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Music and the Mind by Anthony Storr. I used it as reference for an instalment of my column 'Film + Music' in the journal Legend. The article was entitled 'Music and the Brain' - rather descriptive, don't you think? ;)

Other music-related books:-

A Heart at Fire's Center by Stephen Smith, a biography about the life and work of Bernard Herrmann.

On the Track by Fred Karlin and Rayburn Wright.

Listening to Movies by Fred Karlin.

The Devil's Horn by Michael Segell.
 

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The Miles Autobiography. A fascinating read if you're at all interested in jazz in the late '40's early '50's. Of course it'd only be a pamphlet if they edited out the profanity.
 

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The Inner Game of Music.
 

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Here are some books that my first professor actually recommended to me:

The Art of Practicing - Madeline Bruser (its actually geared toward pianists, but a lot of the ideas can easily translate to saxophone)

Zen and the Art of Archery

The Joy of Music - Leonard Bernstein

Notes from the Green Room (this wasn't in print when I bought it, but there are enough copies around to find one)

I would also recommend finding an Adolph Sax biography. I read a few for a recent project and found them to be really interesting and informative.
 

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'This Is Your Brain On Music'

I just finished reading this one and really liked it a lot. The author, Daniel Levitin, used to be a producer and is now a neuroscientist investigating how the mind perceives music. The stuff on music memory was a blast as he quotes old music lyrics to demonstrate rhythm and the song rolls out in your head perfectly. He has an engaging way of writing where paragraphs seem to end in cliff-hanger questions which get answered in the next paragraph. Makes the book quite the page turner. It's a difficult book to read in small spurts as you have to understand the steps he's taken to get to his conclusions so I don't recommend it as a bathroom book:D .
 

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Reedsplinter said:
Interesting you should ask this question! I just read the fascinating new book by neurologist Oliver Sacks: Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain. Highly recommended!
I bought this book on Saturday, dipped into it but not started reading in depth yet. One thing Sacks shares with Anthony Storr (whom I mentioned before), is the erroneous assumption that in the presence of rhythm (Sakcs mentions a Grateful Dead concert), EVERYONE will keep time and/or be moved to dance around to it, as it is a neurological reaction.

If listening to music or attending a concert, I do not dance around. I do not PREVENT myself from doing so, I just don't do it. For one thing, I can't dance (but I can when playing sax, strangely) and hate it anyway - I am too self conscious to dance - and self conscious in general - unless that sax is in my hands.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Reedsplinter said:
Interesting you should ask this question! I just read the fascinating new book by neurologist Oliver Sacks: Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain. Highly recommended!
An interesting book. I've read it now, many of the case studies are downrght depressing. (imagine having a memory span of only a few seconds...). It was a little on the medical side as far as writing style, but a good read nonetheless.

I recently read "The Making of A Love Supreme." Very interesting.
 

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Helmholtz, On the Sensations of Tone
 

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Has anyone read "The Devil's Horn" by Michael Segell? This is a great book; one I want to read again. It's about a guy who loves his tenor sax and decides to find out all there is to know about it - the instrument, its creator, its history its masters and its aficionados. I highly recommend it.

Pinky
 
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