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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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Re: Mistake sorry

Sorry wrong section, but couldnt delete it anymore...
Many oil/grease type materials rot leather.

I have just been working on a sax with the dark leather characteristically associated with applications of grease or oil. The leather was about as tough as thin, soggy cardboard. the head of a needle could easily be poked through it. That sax needed a repad. Expensive!

Another reason is that sticking pads is enough of a problem with saxes without applying any material that encourages that in the slightest way.
 

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If you say grease, to me that can mean anything from margarine to used engine oil. I once asked one of the more well known and bigger wodwind and workshops in my country. The answer the gave me was: "it can be appropriate if you do it when the pads are new".

I don´t know. There is some very fine leather treatment that will preserve and restore the leather. But when applying it (to your pads?) you have to be very careful.
I have sometimes been using it on pads where parts of the skin on the pad were hardened (i.e. darkened) and for cleaning. Applying carefully with a q-tip just barely touched with the skin treatment and when the key is off the sax. Then wait some time and gently rub off with a piece of cloth or paper or a q-tip on the rim. By doing that I say I´d extended the life of some pads.

Just wonder how many of you would directly advice to not treat the pads in any way.

Do you eventually clean the pads if so, how do you do that?

Regards
 

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You can use alcohol or solvents to clean pads with to remove dirt, grease and oil from them and allow the alcohol or solvent to evaporate before refitting.

Don't use solvents on pads with plastic coated leather or plastic resonators as they can dissolve plastic, so if in doubt, use alcohol.
 

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Because of its tendency to be reborn in many forms , this, like many other recurrent threads reminds me of the:

Hydra |ˈhīdrə|
1 Greek Mythology a many-headed snake whose heads grew again as they were cut off, killed by Hercules.
• [as n. ] ( hydra) a thing that is hard to overcome or resist because of its pervasive or enduring quality or its many aspects.

..........anyway :)..........a few searches on the resident search engine return many results. Happy reading!

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http://www.saxontheweb.net/Resource...=www.saxontheweb.net/&ref=&ss=6828j6372416j19
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Havent tried it but I think rain-x might work as it is a siliconizing agent that doesnt leave an oil behind.
 

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In addition to finding the right oil for the leather, it must be the right oil for the brass tone hole. I know from having "greased" boots, knife sheaths, etc., that an oil which appears to help the leather can react with brass rivets, eyelets, and grommets attached to the leather. The brass often turns green where it contacts the oiled leather and seems to stiffen/weaken the leather right where it needs strength. If your toneholes have been leveled or don't have a lacquer finish on the pad surface, your oiled pads will sit (wet) on raw brass. You'll get a nice green ring that causes the pad to fail. That's the "why not" part.

The part I don't understand it the "why" part. Do you want your pads waterproof? Do you want them to not stick? Do you want them to taste better? Do you want them darker, slipperier, shinier, smellier? For all of these, I would recommend cod liver oil.

Mark
 

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yes, more and more looking like the hydra ........or like that guy who every time he boiled a kettle claim the invention of hot water
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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The non-powder stuff that I find safest (for not rotting leather or making it sticky) and most successful (at reducing stickiness and water absorption), if something must be applied to pad leather, is 3M's Scotchguard for fabric. (Not the one for suede leather, which has some oil added).

Yes, a hydra. It's all been said before, so many times.
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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Eh?
See post 6.

BTW I have just worked on a sax with black pads that were treated presumably with silicone. They have that characteristic grippy feel of silicone, and slightly shiny. They are sticky.
 

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Forum Contributor 2011, SOTW's pedantic pet rodent
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Castrol GTX: Liquid Engineering.

.. perhaps not.

Or the one for lawnmowers? :mrgreen:
 

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Some folks recommended "neats foot oil" for pads years ago. I tried it but don't recall the result.

The Fox bassoon company used to use liquid carnuba wax to seal their leather bassoon pads but I heard that they have used a silicon compound of some sort more recently. I have found that liquid carnuba wax is good for sealing the pores in leather saxophone pads. I would not put oil or grease of any kind on saxophone pads as I believe that debris and dust would cling to them too much and there could be unwanted sticking. Over many years, greased or oiled pads probably might deteriorate more than untreated pads.
 

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Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
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"...I would not put oil or grease of any kind on saxophone pads as I believe that debris and dust would cling to them too much and there could be unwanted sticking...."
Exactly!

"...Over many years, greased or oiled pads probably might deteriorate more than untreated pads."
Yes indeed, and that especially includes Neatsfoot oil. The structure of the leather eventually breaks down and it becomes brittle, and cuts easily. This may not apply to all oils, but certainly applies to some if not all vegetable oils.
 

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Bassoon pads are often waxed within the tonehole impression (as opposed to waxing the entire face of the pad) to keep the leather in the centre from sagging into the tonehole which would cause stuffiness and possible tuning/intonation problems, effectively acting like a resonator. But due to the odd shape of some bassoon toneholes, round resonators aren't always best and wax can be made into any shape. As an extra precaution, the centres of the large diameter pads are often stitched as well.
 

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I used to use carnuba wax for carving to make jewelry castings in metal. It was the hardest wax I could get and could take a really smooth finish.
I wonder if that is the same material?
 

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I think paraffin wax or beeswax is used on bassoon pads due to the considerably lower melting point compared to carnuba wax. It's only applied as a thin layer instead of being built up to form a dome which would defeat the object.
 

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Not that I know what the long term effect will be, but I did use some lanolin for treating a very hard pad. It softened the pad fine, and I didn't have to replace it as a result. Lanolin is the sheeps' natural deffence to protect it's hair/skin, I imagine the effect will not be detrimental. But again, this was a pad I was going to end up tossing, and now works fine. I did use Yamaha powdered paper to clean the pad after treatment.
 
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