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I’ve been using the Rico Metalite M5 on my bari and it’s working out great as I usually play outside with loud bands. I was wanting to pickup a mouthpiece that may be a little mellower but still feels and plays similar to the Metalite. Was thinking the Graftonite might work. Has anyone played both? Do they both have similar playing characteristics but just sound different?

Also, is there any place to buy and sell used mouthpieces and such? Doesn’t seem to be and place to do that on this site.
 

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We have an entire Marketplace sub forum. However as the rules clearly state, new members of less than six months and fewer than fifty posts are not permitted to view, access, or utilize that restricted area.
 

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Has anyone played both? Do they both have similar playing characteristics but just sound different?
If you want to read about this there have been many such question before and they are all in the archives, since these mouthpieces haven’t changed the resouces of this forum are a VERY precious source of information.

I would strongly advise you to consult the archives before.

Here a few links for your leisure.

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?111474-Rico-Mouthpieces-Graftonite-vs-Metalite
https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?55889-Metalite-And-Graftonite&p=474350#post474350

Here you should find my search, there are as much as 282 hits for the search “ graftonite metallite differences”

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/gtsea...=www.saxontheweb.net/&ref=&ss=6570j2143440j31
 

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Picked up a Graftonite today. Sounds awful! May have to spend some money to get what I want.
Maybe you should have tried first (the bright side is, it was cheap). The limitation of hearsay is that what one like won’t tell yu anything about you would like it, not only that but also the fact that you come from something different. Your body (Ear-Embouchure) is not at all used to this mouthpiece. One should always give any piece of equipment to give the body the change to start working differently with something new.
 

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Maybe you should have tried first (the bright side is, it was cheap). The limitation of hearsay is that what one like won’t tell yu anything about you would like it, not only that but also the fact that you come from something different. Your body (Ear-Embouchure) is not at all used to this mouthpiece. One should always give any piece of equipment to give the body the change to start working differently with something new.
I was able to return it actually. One of the nice things about amazon..... I’m sure that because I’m still new to the Sax that I should just stick with 1 mouthpiece and learn to play it. I do have an Otto Link 6* that came with the horn. I’ve always found it difficult to play. Played that for and hour this morning. It’s much warmer sounding but the notes are very flat when I play it. At this point I’m probably just used to playing the Metalite.
 

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well, an Otto Link 6* is a good mouthpiece but if you are really a beginner and try to play ( as many do) with a reed way too hard for them (it is not a race to play lollipops, I play on soft reeds after years of playing and a mouthpiece just a little more open than yours) you may have problems to achieve the sound that you MAY want to get (?).

I would personally prefer an Otto LInk to any metalite but the operative word is “ personally”. Give yourself the chance to develop a sound, playing the saxophone is not blowing through the mouthpiece and get a sound but it is doing something with your embouchure. Good Luck!

Watch this. Listen to what Don Menza says.

 

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well, an Otto Link 6* is a good mouthpiece but if you are really a beginner and try to play ( as many do) with a reed way too hard for them (it is not a race to play lollipops, I play on soft reeds after years of playing and a mouthpiece just a little more open than yours) you may have problems to achieve the sound that you MAY want to get (?).

I would personally prefer an Otto LInk to any metalite but the operative word is “ personally”. Give yourself the chance to develop a sound, playing the saxophone is not blowing through the mouthpiece and get a sound but it is doing something with your embouchure. Good Luck!

Watch this. Listen to what Don Menza ]
Thanks for the video. 2.5 Rico. Could try a 2 with th Otto Link maybe?
 

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You may want to try but don’t think that you can just blow and get a good sound without doing anything else with your embouchure. Controlling the sound a soft reed is actually more difficult than playing an hard reed. Try to listen to subtoned sounds and see if you can achieve that (that warm sound that Menza gets is a subtoned sound)

You need to develop an embouchure but also to develop a sound concept. Nothing comes easy. Good Luck!
 

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since these mouthpieces haven’t changed the resouces of this forum are a VERY precious source of information.
Picked up a Graftonite today. Sounds awful! May have to spend some money to get what I want.
Maybe you should have tried first (the bright side is, it was cheap). The limitation of hearsay is that what one like won’t tell yu anything about you would like it
Yes - the bright side is, it was cheap, and what an excellent demonstration of the principle: other people can't test mouthpieces for you. Imagine shelling out for a $500 The-Latest-Muscatel-Must-Have mouthpiece, and finding out that you just blew $500.

Though as milandro was trying to say above, there is the matter of learning to get the sound you want out of a mouthpiece. Another common observation is that with whatever mouthpiece, you sound like you. That's only partly true, but another way to look at it is: if you don't sound like you yet, you haven't learned to play that mouthpiece.
 

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Yes - the bright side is, it was cheap, and what an excellent demonstration of the principle: other people can't test mouthpieces for you. Imagine shelling out for a $500 The-Latest-Muscatel-Must-Have mouthpiece, and finding out that you just blew $500.

Though as milandro was trying to say above, there is the matter of learning to get the sound you want out of a mouthpiece. Another common observation is that with whatever mouthpiece, you sound like you. That's only partly true, but another way to look at it is: if you don't sound like you yet, you haven't learned to play that mouthpiece.
Where I’m at is this. I do believe you all that your sound takes time to evolve and am working on it. 10 years from now it’ll still be evolving. When I first started playing that Metalite mouthpiece it was really harsh sounding but it sounds much better now and it’s fairly easy to play so I can see it that things can get better on it. 2 things though. 1, the guy who recommended the Metalite and uses it himself and has been playing for 40 years, has a very harsh sound. so it makes me wonder how much better it will ever get. 2 , when I use the Otto link I get what I consider a real nice bari Sax sound today. I do however struggle a bit playing it. Seems like it needs more air and I generally have to think a bit more to make sure I don’t miss notes. I realize it’s work to become better and I’m up for it I was just looking for a mouthpiece that brought me a little closer to where I want to be sound wise without having to struggle for air.
 

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When I was just playing on my first alto, I thought that I had been overgorwing the first mouthpiece, so I went to a shop and found they had two mouthpieces, an Otto Link STM and a Berg Larsen SMS 2. I bought the latter and prooceeded to peel paint from walls with this mouthpiece, I have no idea of how I played back then but it was, I think, pretty much lik many do, straight into the mouthpiece.

I probably had a “ splattered “ sound with a mouthpiece which takes no prisoners and can shoot a pea at 100 yds. Then I started to frequent an impro workshop and there there was a teachen playing ballads on his tenor with a sound that was powerful, war, room filling and not at all like I played before. Mmmm, I thoght, this was what I wanted to do.

From then on I proceeded to try things, but I also tried to “ do things “ with what I tired which had something to do with the sound concept that I now had.

Which is what I am getting to.

As Don Menza says, it is not into the blowing, it is DOING something with your lips and oral cavity, in one word your embouchure, when you are playing.
 

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milandro;3969520 Which is what I am getting to. As Don Menza says said:
I actually really enjoy that video for that reason. I had been doing some of the things he talked about instinctively but was told they were wrong. Thanks again for sending that. I think I’ll stick with what I’ve been using for now and keep playing/ practicing. I am peeling a little paint too but I’m working on it. Still trying to get the sound I want.
 

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the goal is the way to the goal
 
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