Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
41,895 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have never seen them before and I was very surprised to see these Gordon Beeson Pads , a bit crude a way to brand your product (I think it is a rubber stamp) but effective nevertheless


Patent 1949- 1950




“...
685,768. Saxophones. BEESON, G. Nov. 15, 1950 [Nov. 15, 1949], No. 29262/49. Class 88 (ii). A valve pad for a saxophone is faced with a slightly concave disc d of nickel silver. The pad comprises a disc of box-cloth a backed with cardboard band covered with a skiver c. The pad and the metal disc are secured together by means of a double headed rivet f, one head g of which is concave to conform to the shape of the metal disc. The metal disc is turned at the edge e to bite into the skiver covering...."



Product Automotive tire Rim Circle Auto part
Gas Auto part Circle Font Rim


apparently he had clarinet pads too (Only GB there was no space!)

Green Wood Grass Gas Font
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
alto: 82Zii/Medusa/Supreme, tenor: Medusa, bari: b-901, sop, sc-990
Joined
·
7,617 Posts
Interesting design. Where did you find these?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
41,895 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was just looking at horns and I noticed that the pads were barnded this way. I run a little search and I saw these were highly appreciated in the ’50.

Gordon Beeson apparently was a repairer also an avid collector of Jazz photography, he also wrote for a magazine called “ Crescendo" , there was a thread here but the pictures have disappeared froim it.
I think these were some of the pics

Musical instrument Musician Brass instrument Wind instrument Music
Musical instrument Brass instrument Musician Reed Wind instrument
Military person Gesture Brass instrument Musician Woodwind instrument
Footwear Trousers Musical instrument Musician Music
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,596 Posts
My 10m (sold originally in the English market) had Gordon Beeson pads in it when I bought it. I suspect that Gordon Beeson did the relacquer, which is one of the better ones I've ever seen. I think it might have been Stuart from the Woodwind Exchange who mentioned just how good these pads are. They'd been in my horn for probably a good 50 years at the time I bought it and after a quick adjustment, the horn played top to bottom without a single problem. Of course, it needed an overhaul soon after because the pads were ancient, but it was impressive all the same!

If you do a search, there are quite a few mentions of Gordon Beeson pads on the forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,321 Posts
Yeah, I've also had a couple of saxophones here that had Gordon Beeson pads. I also reacted to the way he branded his pads. A bit crude but clever.
I think he was a good tech. I got that impression on both saxophones (even though both were due for a complete overhaul).
At least he was good at marketing, as we discuss this decades after he was still active.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Freddy Gregory ( or Grichevski I think his original name was) used to write his name on his pads too (I found a mix of GB and FG pads on my tenor!).

I was told that in the 50s and 60s players used to take brand new instruments to Gordon Beeson for relacquer he was so good, heard this from a few people but it may be an old wife's tale.

I believe when he passed away, Lewington (another big name in the British saxophone world) bought the machinery for the pads as they intended to carry on making them... it obviously never happened!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Here is a short story about Gordon Beeson in an interview extract with the wonderful tenor sax player Bobby Wellins:

 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
41,895 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, I’ve read of his relacquering while researching him.

He was certainly good but may people in the business were doing this as a routine until the ’80 when it became fashionable to have a “ shabby chic” saxophone to say nothing about the fact that if you attempt to sell a relacquered horn now it will substantially cut the value (which was obviously not there until the ’80).
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top