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· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Condition is unknown -- hopefully not a basket case. Doesn't look bad in the pics, but I know the rim of the bell is not round. Posting said that "all the valves work". ahem So, this may be a new adventure. I am friendly with a local instrument tech.
OK, well, yeah it's a good model. It will most definitely NOT play up and down smoothly, though, so do be prepared for $200+ worth of repair work (if you are lucky).

That's the thing about auction horns....even IF the seller claims it plays, it needs work 90% of the time.
For a horn which seller made no claim of playability...again, expect that you will have to invest in making it so.

A reliable workhorse horn, very very popular...a bit soul-less, IMHO compared to an old King, Buescher, Conn, etc.

But again, very respectable.

In cleaned and serviced shape, no significant body issues, playing up and down, with case - these have a current market value of around $700 (yes, really...folks who claim otherwise have NOT been keeping abreast of current values).
So if you are one who gauges success based upon "only invest a total of what it is currently worth"...then there's your yardstick.
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Thanks for your observations. Yes, I still see postings from people who bought good horns a couple of years ago who can't imagine that current prices are way more now. And yeah, if my "investment" goes over $700-ish I have lost the wager, I think.
Well...honestly I would have NEVER expected a Tenor model which in 2019 cost around $500 in playable shape to now have a market value of $700-750...but that's what happened, so who knows what it will be in 2026 ?

Incidentally, I wasn't suggesting the horn needs a full repad or O/H, I doubt it does....70% of used project horns really do NOT...and from the pics thos one doesn't seem to have been abused. So my guess is...$200 or so will get it speaking up and down acceptably.

"Lost wager" ....depends on your perspective. Many people here - including I - who have experience in purchasing used horns do not abide by the notion: "you have taken a loss if you invest more into it than its current resale value". That's an arguable position.
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Just learned that the Geo. M. Bundy signature mouthpiece that came with my Vito is something of a collector's item! There are listings on reverb and ebay for these for up to $75! I'm keepin' mine, though.
Well yes, those are the listed prices but I am not sure someone would actually spend that on one.
On the other hand, they are pretty good...I mean, large chamber, good, manageable tip opening, so if not damaged yeah, you saved at lest #30 on having to buy a mouthpiece.
I've never seen an all-black Ebolin, they usually have a white bite plate insert. Is this one definitely labeled "Ebolin"? (There are a LOT of variants amongst Brilharts.)
The Brilhart Special, contrary to the implication of its name, was a budget mouthpiece put out by Brilly. Plastic yes, tip opening on small side....nothing like a classic vintage Brilly BUT...not BAD at all. If it didn't have the bite mark it'd definitely be a good, usable 'piece as well. Might be if you go with a cushion...
Oh! Forgot something. When I swabbed the neck after playing, IT CAME OUT GREEN! EWWW!
I washed the swab cloth and ran hot water in the neck for a while (holding the pip with my finger), then ran a disposable dry wipe cloth through the neck a couple times. Swabbing the body resulted in a bit more undesirable color. I elected not to hose out the body, but I did wash the swab cloth. Gonna have nightmares about this tonight, no doubt.
OK so I hope the hose comment was tongue-in cheek :oops:

It probably needs a body cleaning, but to do that you'd need to of course disassemble the horn, remove the keywork. If you don't feel comfy doing that, and reassembling...don't try.

The horns sounds like it has leaks if the lows do not speak cleanly. If you wanna buy a leak light...you can check yourself.

If you are lucky, the leaks will be in the stack keys and they may be removable by using the adjusting screws on the Ckey and F# key benches, as well as maybe the G# ones.
If they are not....then there'd need to be either refloating, key bending, or pad replacing....in which case, probably a tech visit is in order.
Disassembly, cleaning body and neck, topically wiping the pads with some naptha, some leak removal, maybe change a few pads...that shouldn't run more than around $200 and maybe it won't even need all of that.

Depends on how much you wanna try some DIY.
Congrats, no significant body damage and playing up and down to a good degree..you cannot ask for more from a GW horn.
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Turf: Yes, it says "Ebolin", but also where the opening number is, it says "special", which, in marketing-speak, means "not so special". Means "student" in this case. I put a pad on over the chew marks.
Jaye: Yes, the hose out comment was tongue in cheek. Thanks for the pointers. I feel an urge to try a few DIY things, but I am fearful of having to present a "bag job" to a tech. And yeah, I kinda feel like I should go buy a lotto ticket after this!
The only thing I can suggest DIY if you don't wanna mess with removing the keys, is to buy a padsaver swab and spray it with a water+naptha 50-50 solution until it is slightly damp (don't soak it) - then you can insert it in the body tube, rotate it around a few times, and pull out...it might get some icky stuff out. If the solution gets on any pads, it's fine too.
No harm done.

Do same thing with a cloth on bellside, drop it in the bell, push it down with a stick or something, remove it thru the Low C tonehole (this would require removing the Low C and Eb keys but those are easy-easy to put back on).
If the toneholes have residue on their edges, get some 500 or 600 grit sandpaper (black preferable), slide it between the pad and hold, press key down lightly, pull the paper out, repeat until you start seeing brass on the edge again. Last time, instead of the sandpaper use a cloth,very slightly damp, to get off any metal residue.

Then the leak light...find where the leaks are.
 
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