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Last year, I picked up a Meyer 6m alto piece on eBay, real cheap. It's not a New York but IMHO, it's a great piece. It's old and based on the depth of the bite mark, it was well and truly loved by a prior owner. It has a round chamber/sidewalls, is extremely powerful and very original.

My question is this; is there a transitional model that is essentially a NY, but produced after the New York name was no longer engraved on them? Or are some of the post "New York" models particularly good? Or perhaps, any Meyer is just that much better than most other alto pcs?
If there is a prior post on the subject, please advise.
:cool:
 

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When JJ Babbitt took over the MeYeR line in the early 70's the mouthpieces were closer to the New York, USA models that were the final offering of the MeYer company. The rubber was good quality, but the pieces for the most part didn't ring out like the real MeYeRs. As mass production and demand increased...well you can guess what happened to the quality over the years. The piece devolved. I have played real Meyers for over 30 years and playing a current model is like taking a shower with a raincoat and boots on. But occasionally you get a really good early Babbitt Meyer.
 

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i have 1 of the early ones with no markings on it other than the facing no. great player but still nothing comes close to my old ny meyer that i sold for 100$!!!
 

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If the sidewalls are dug-out and rounded - It sounds like you have either a transition piece or some sort of reface-chamber-wroked-on mouthpiece. All of the current Meyers I've played and owned have straight sidewalls.
 

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jentone said:
All of the current Meyers I've played and owned have straight sidewalls.
Umm, No. While the sidewall concavity is rather subtle, the chamber sidewalls on current production Meyer alto mpcs (including the "G model") are concave on all the chamber sizes. Except for a very slightly different radius at the junction of the sidewall and "roof" the current production models are dimensionally virtually indistiguishable from the "New York USA" models and certainly play identically if comparably prepared. I still think the "typical" or "average" MeYer Bros alto mpcs are horribly overrated and overpriced. I have owned and played many of them since the mid-'50's and have "blueprinted" many more in the last 20 years. They were AT LEAST as "inconsistent" as any that JJ Babbitt has produced since buying the Meyer brand in 1970. I won't comment here about the MeYeR Bros "replicas" being currently offered for sale.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Doc or others, if I post a pic or two of this piece, can you tell more or less what I've got?
 

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I read somewhere awhile back that the NEW YORK USA was made by Babbitt. Then the heirs of the Meyers Bros. complained it was confusing-- the Babbitt's werent produced in NY. So then BABBIT took off the NEW YORK USA lettering.

According to two posts above, there is an understanding (which I believe to be false) above that the NEW YORK USA were the last pieces produced by the MEYER BROS. rather than the first pieces produced by BABBIT.

If what I say is correct, it would explain why there are as many measurable inconsistencies between the NEW YORK USA as the later BABBITT's-- beacuse the NEW YORK USA models were produced by BABBITT and not the MEYER BROTHERS.

On another post by GWINDPLAYER elsewhere on SOTW if i recall correctly he seems to believe that the facing numbers on the NEW YORK USA are different than the earlier pieces because the Meyer Brothers modernized their facing number system. If what I assert is true, that the NEW YORK USA models were made by BABBITT, then the answer is that there was an abrupt change in facing number system starting with the NEW YORK USA models because BABBITT made them and utilized the BABBIT facing numbe system.

I have been reading SOTW for a few years, and I think some of the older posts from years ago back up the assertion i make above, but i could be mistaken. I think there was some info contained on the history of Meyer mouthpieces on THEO's website but its not online now.

I also recall reading somewhere, i think, that although the NEW YORK USA pieces were made by BABBITT, that Phil Woods preferred and played them over the earlier MEYER BROS. mouthpieces.

My understanding of the facing numbers is that a REAL NY MEYER BROS. 5 would roughly equate to about the same as a BABBITT 6 or 7 (starting with the NEW YORK USA model made by BABBITT.

Recently i heard someone say "I love my NY MEYER because it is so much more open than the ones most people have it is a 7." I think mostly likely he had a NEW YORK USA 7, which i belive was made by BABBITT and is likely no more open in facing than a REAL NY MEYER 5.

SOTW has had some changes with forum providers and the old messages are likely not searchable that may pertain to these issues. (They may be archived somewhere i dont know.)

(All of the above is rumour, hearsay, conjecture, based on my memory which may be faulty, dont accept it as fact, do your own research please.)
 

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I read through Theo's website using that resource mentioned above. he doesnt say whether NY USA were made by Babbit. I think, and read elsewhere, that they were. whats ironic, i think, is if this refacer is using as a holy grail example of the vintage meyer, a NY USA model, because that is a Babbitt piece, same as the new ones.
 
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