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I need to improve my swing on bari, does anyone have some good songs i could listen to, so i can get the feel of sax swing? Thanks
 

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Well, yeah, Duke & Count for sure.

Also check out Doug James on bari. He plays with Duke Robillard. Here he is with Gordon Beale on this clip:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tG5BoPp83PI&feature=related

Listen to Roomful of Blues and some of the jump bands also.

And then of course, in the jazz genre, anything with Gerry Mulligan will swing like crazy.
 

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The key to swinging really hard, is playing straighter eighth notes than you would think, always emphasizing the off-beats (the "and" of the beat) on top of the drummer playing the swing beat. But I'd agree, Basie would definitely be a good guide.

Also, if you play accented and separated quarter notes over a swingin' rhythm section that creates a MASSIVE swing effect.
 

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The key to swinging really hard, is playing straighter eighth notes than you would think, always emphasizing the off-beats (the "and" of the beat) on top of the drummer playing the swing beat.
a few months ago I was listening to a Benny Goodman recording from the 30s and was quite surprised about how even the eighth notes were. but they were definitely swinging!
 

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I need to improve my swing on bari, does anyone have some good songs i could listen to, so i can get the feel of sax swing? Thanks
Get this:

http://www.amazon.com/Blue-Serge-Bo...3VGU/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1316142994&sr=8-6

and this:

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Atom...=sr_1_1?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1316143054&sr=1-1

Listen very carefully to the bari in the Basie band -- particularly in Li'l Darlin'. You'll hear him do things in the ballads, like glissandos down that aren't actually in the score. You'll also hear how he projects, just a little, above the rest of the section to give it some meat.
 

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Any of the Big Bands from the 40's would be good. Ellington, Basie, Goodman, Shaw (Artie), Herman, the Dorsey brothers (Tommy and Jimmy), and one of my personal favorites.. Glenn Miller.
 

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The key to swinging really hard, is playing straighter eighth notes than you would think, always emphasizing the off-beats (the "and" of the beat) on top of the drummer playing the swing beat. But I'd agree, Basie would definitely be a good guide.

Also, if you play accented and separated quarter notes over a swingin' rhythm section that creates a MASSIVE swing effect.
No. The key to swinging really hard with a baritone is choking up a lot, unless you have really big arms like Babe Ruth.
 

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Get some Nick Brignola records.
Also listen to Basie records with the Marshall Royal sax section. Flight of the Foo Birds, Tickle Toe, Corner Pocket are all great examples.
 

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There are some great bari players out there (based on your previous posts regarding being a bari player), but your best bet would be to listen to some Dexter Gordon and soak up the laid back, yet killin' swing groove.
 

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I'm afraid I'm going to have to disagree a wee bit with what some of you are saying about the eighth notes. My guess is that you wouldn't be saying that if there hasn't been, over the years, the emphasis of the triple feel against the duple feel to describe swing. I mean, when people were playing square, the first way to get them out of that was to explain that in swing you don't play the eighths straight but you play them more in a triple feel. And by comparison to straight eights, that's pretty much true. I mean, think about it. What else are you going to tell them?

So now, after decades of people being told that you don't play eights straight, you play them with a triple feel, people are saying, "yeah, wellll, not realllyyy?" and that's right too. And the faster it goes, the straighter they become. But you listen to Basie playing a typical Nestico chart and they are hardly playing straight eights on medium tempo charts.

So I would recommend a little caution about how and when we tell people that eighth notes really don't have a triple feel to them because in comparison to straight eight notes they do. IMO it's all in context.

Now what swings? Here - this swings:
 

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Your tagline? :mrgreen:
 
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