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Thanks, but that is the article that we’ve quoted many times when talking or, among others, about Rampone or Santoni

Other people , including me, have quoted this before

Could some one please help me find out more information about this sax, how old, rare and valuable it can be in the market for collectors? It's in excellent condition.

I could find only this information about Ferdinando Roth:

The label on the garland reads "Premiata Fabbrica / Ferdo. Roth Milano." Roth was born in Adorf, Germany in 1815 and died in Milan, Italy in 1898. He worked first for Pelitti, and later as a foreman in Prague and Vienna. The establishement of his Premiata Fabbrica in Milan is given variously as 1838, and 1842. Roth instruments were exhibited in Florence (1861), Santiago (1875), Milan (1881, 45 brass instruments, and 1894). An 1878 city directory lists the address at vis S. Giovanni in Conca 9, Milano. In 1892 a one-page catalogue was issued, "Premiata fabbrica d'instrumenti musicali in ottone e legno Ferdinando Roth." In 1894 he advertised as a specialist in saxophones and claimed to be the original supplier of Aida trumpets made according to Verdi's instructions. In 1894, blind and in his eighties, he put his son-in-law, Antonio Bottali, in charge and on his death in 1898 the firm became Roth & Bottali.

Ferdinando Roth invented the Rothphone:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rothphone

he is very well mentioned in this research, as the probably the most important sax maker of his time in italy:
http://woodwindshelp.weebly.com/uploads/2/3/7/9/23791000/italy_sax.pdf

Thanks.
It is Alfonso Rampone and Rampone e Cazzani. Two different companies (please spell the names right because you will never find them otherwise)

the available history of these horns is available in a document written by Emanuele Raganato (it’s not much) it tells you only the foundation date of the company.

http://woodwindshelp.weebly.com/uploads/2/3/7/9/23791000/italy_sax.pdf

So, no, Rampone & Cazzani, a different company, certainly predates the Alfonso Rampone company.
Thanks for the insight, makes sense as the first Orfeo was sent to Conn to learn their manufacturing techniques, came back and implemented those learnings at his father's factory.

See the link below. By 1930 the split bell keys appear to have gone from the Borgani catalogue. The source source suggests that Arnaldo Borgani did not appear as engraving until 1927 Elsewhere I find references to 1915. So looks like you guys were spot on in your period estimates. Best estimate perhaps 1927-1929?

http://woodwindshelp.weebly.com/uploads/2/3/7/9/23791000/italy_sax.pdf.

I am very curious to see how this instrument plays. Bought for very little, so no great loss if it doesn't come up to scratch, but bodywork seems free of dents and re-soldering. I'll know more when it arrives...
they were an Italian made horn heavily inspired on Conn (at least that was the intention).

Read here some notes on Alfonso Rampone written by Emanuele Raganato

http://woodwindshelp.weebly.com/uploads/2/3/7/9/23791000/italy_sax.pdf
 

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maybe you forgot but you were featuring in those threads too, I trust that at the time you followed the link.

Yes, Emmanuele Raganato (also a known mouthpiece maker whom worked with R&C at one time) interviewed several people for this article and couldn’t miss Claudio Zolla (and his father and uncle). The minute village of Quarna sotto had three major factories.

Paré in the Como province is also a minute village, they had Santoni there. Orsi was the only make in a big city well, we should maybe include Desidera-Stowasser in Tireste too.
 

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:) we all get a little bit older every day, the goal is the way not the arrival
 
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