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I'm baffled by this: "you want a tiny bit of light in the front that shuts off with finger pressure". REALLY?? Isn't it like... a leak?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There is no a leak at the front. But there is more light at the front than in the back just before its closed. In other words - you want the back to close the smallest fraction before the front. Because of the geometry - the back (near the hynge) moves less than the front. So by the time you apply normal finger pressure - the front and back will have the same pressure seal against the tonehole rim.

Otherwise you risk having the front gain on the back and then with normal finger pressure - the front has more seal pressure on the tonehole rim than the back. This mistake is what happens when you try to make the front & back touch at the same instant (before normal finger pressure comes to bear) - you often end up with a leak in the back near the hynge. All good repairmen know this.
 

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There is no a leak at the front. But there is more light at the front than in the back just before its closed. In other words - you want the back to close the smallest fraction before the front. Because of the geometry - the back (near the hynge) moves less than the front. So by the time you apply normal finger pressure - the front and back will have the same pressure seal against the tonehole rim.

Otherwise you risk having the front gain on the back and then with normal finger pressure - the front has more seal pressure on the tonehole rim than the back. This mistake is what happens when you try to make the front & back touch at the same instant (before normal finger pressure comes to bear) - you often end up with a leak in the back near the hynge. All good repairmen know this.
Thanks for clarifying!
 

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I like this a lot and I understand that the trick of the spring loaded pad makes things easier for a thin and hard pad that hasn't got the " give" that a " normal" leather pad has.

However (the technicians will pardon me if I am saying something stupid because I am not a tech) this seems to be a nice little trick that could be used on other pads too , for example the black Kangaroo pads are credited to be thin and hard (probably not as much as these) and , who knows , they might benefit from this too?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The resonator helps keep the gold pad together so its necessary.

The gold pads have a stiff plastic backing that makes the pads very flat and they stay flat so the spring pushes the flat gold pad against a flat tonehole and you get a perfect seal. Sometimes you have to check and correct the tonehole flatness with the diamond tonehole file tool as shown in the video. Leather pads are not as flat as gold pads so the spring technique doesn't work as well with them. But I wont' keep anyone from trying it.

See the new "Gold sax pad installation demo" at:


more info at jsengineering.net
 

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yes, I understand the problem of the backing. I remember someone selling pads with a metal backing like those in the old days..........
 
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