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Discussion Starter #1
A few days ago I visited Saxofoonwinkel in Deventer NL.
I tested several nexks on my Ref. 54 tenor:

1. 2 Selmer SA 80 neck solid silver, older models
2. Selmer SA 80 standard, older models
3. Paraschos wooden neck, new
4. Gloger Handcraft neck solid copper, new
Why did I test necks? I wanted to know how different necks effect attack, sound, dynamics and intonation.

Results:
1. Selmer solid silver: very little difference compared with the original neck.
Slightly more overtones, nearly identical intonation.

2. Selmer standard: sound a bit dampened, intonation a bit bader (from E3 upwards definitely to sharp)

3. Paraschos: very nice and warm sound, better attack especially regarding the low register. PP easier to play, intonation was the same as with the original neck. But: stuffy D2!!!

4. Gloger: WOW!!!!
A bit more overtones, easier attack from bottom to top. Very homogeneous sound in the full register.
And much easier intonation. Especially D2, E2 and palm keys. D2 is very easy to be played with an open sound, homogeneous to its neighbours.
Playing pp is very easy from bottom to top, palm keys in pp and good intonation are superb. With the original neck it is a much harder job.
Playing louder is easier too. So the dynamic range of the gloger, compared with the original neck is extended.

Material:
Instrument: Selmer Reference 54 Tenor
MPC: Otto Link Tenney Slant Sig 7
Reeds: Alexander Superial 2,5 und AW-Reeds Jazz 2
Ligature: Rovner Light and EVO 5 (preferable)

I was so excited playing the Gloger that I couldn't resist and bought it directly.:)

I am very happy
Markus
 

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Yep, Glogers are very nice indeed. You don't see too many of these for sale 2nd hand. So that tells you something.

I've heard good things about the Paraschos necks, but I wonder about long term use and possible cracking. I don't think they have any re-inforcement to help the wood stand up to constant use.
 

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I am considering accessorizing my new King Super 20 (without a silver neck) with a Gloger, must take a trip to Deventer! However, I am surprised about your Paraschos findings because a few days ago I was in NYC were Justin Wood was playing at the Garage a nice restaurant in the Village. He has a Mark Vi or a SBA alto with a paraschos neck and I was totally blown away from how nice and mellow this sounded! I don't know if they are prone to crack, one thing is for sure that they have to be kept with great care.

No central heating or intercontinental flights (travelling by car is probably ok) I would keep them in a portable humidoir , like the ones for cigars. (this is not a joke!)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
milandro, you are right. The Paraschos sound sweet and mellow. I liked the sound very much and it was easy to play. But the point was the stuffy D2 that makes me wonder. But as mentioned above, the Gloger was easy to play too and made intonation easier.
Paraschos gives a 5 year warranty. If you are familiar with German read the following article from Klaus Dapper http://www.saxophon-service.de/online/da2006-Paraschos.html
If you are planning to visit Saxofoonwinkel it is good to contact Paul first via email. As far as I've seen they do not have many Glogers directly available.
By the way, Gloger himself has his workshop in the Netherlands too.
Maybe visit him directly?

Markus
 

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tjontheroad said:
Yep, Glogers are very nice indeed. You don't see too many of these for sale 2nd hand. So that tells you something.
My silver Ref 54 Gloger was nice but I got over it. On the other hand, my Ref 36 came with a singularly fine stock neck. Still lovin' your Gloger sop neck?

tjontheroad said:
I've heard good things about the Paraschos necks, but I wonder about long term use and possible cracking. I don't think they have any re-inforcement to help the wood stand up to constant use.
Is Tim Price still using one as his standard setup on his Serie III? I imagine that his has seen ample use.

As far as maintaining humidity: There are enough wooden instruments around to demonstrate that wood can be sufficiently stable. If you play it regularly, that will maintain the moisture content. As to flying and the relative humidity at altitude - put it in a zip lock bag.
 

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Dr G said:
My silver Ref 54 Gloger was nice but I got over it. On the other hand, my Ref 36 came with a singularly fine stock neck. Still lovin' your Gloger sop neck?



Is Tim Price still using one as his standard setup on his Serie III? I imagine that his has seen ample use.

As far as maintaining humidity: There are enough wooden instruments around to demonstrate that wood can be sufficiently stable. If you play it regularly, that will maintain the moisture content. As to flying and the relative humidity at altitude - put it in a zip lock bag.
Yes, I can't go back to the stock neck on the SC-992. Just isn't the same. I don't get much time anymore to play my sop, but the Gloger makes it worth keeping. I'm no master of anything, so any help I can get is worth it.

Tim likes to experiment too. I'd rather him answer your question though. I don't want to speak for him ;)
 

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perhaps I will go to Groningen (it is relatively far away....even for us already in Holland) I guess it will be worth it! Have you seen this?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Q-sqyXhZzA&mode=user&search=
Karsen Gloger (although German by birth speaks Dutch) and talks of his neck making, looks like a great Guy!
Have glanced at the article (my German is just about passable) thanks, is there a Gloger site, I couldn't find it (yet)!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am sure it is worth trying a Gloger neck on your King. Gloger makes necks for different saxes. But be patient, I know that it takes time to reveive the new neck after purchase.

Markus
 

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Who makes the Gloger neck?

I watched their video twice. The show only the fabrication of the octave key mechanism. Why wouldn't they show the fabrication of the neck. That's what it's really all about. Am I being too cynical?
 

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yes , you are.

there is no doubt that Gloger is producing his own necks. However they have an open shop and many customers have seen them working on their horns neck.
 
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