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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Next year I was told that I should do either the Glazunov Concerto or the Ibert by my private lessons teacher...I downloaded and listened to both and I can't decide which to do. I like the music of the Glazunov better but I'd also like to do something different from what I'd normally do, and the Ibert fits that. I was wondering who out there has played these pieces and what they liked about each (what was challenging, fun, etc...). Whatever I pick will be for my college audition, so it's a pretty important decision (I'm a Junior right now, and this would be for next year. I'd like to start ASAP).
 

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Both concertos have their difficult parts. I've played both. If you don't play altissimo, the Glaz is probably a better choice. IMHO the non-altissimo version of the Glaz sounds better than the non-altissimo version of the Ibert.

The Glaz is much easier to put together rhythmically with the tutti than the Ibert. The Ibert has looong phrases.

It took me longer to learn the Ibert than the Glaz.

Just some thoughts....:)
 

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For some reason most high schoolers think that Ibert is THE piece for college auditions because it's so fast and cool sounding. In my opinion I think Glaz would make for a way better college audition.

I think the Ibert is sort of a "flashy" piece, you can play it and make it very musical but I think the musical potential of it does not compare well to the Glazunov. If you can play the Glazunov and bring out it's entire musical potential, making every note (and rest) YOUR OWN, then I think you'll be able to get into any college and get huge scholarships to boot. And the Glazunov will definitely show your technical side pretty nicely too, the cadenza is hard and the end of the piece requires really fast tonguing in sixteenth notes.

Anyhow that's what I think, my professor Mr. Sullivan told me that he'd much rather hear someone play Creston or Heiden Sonata musically then some hotshot kid who thinks he can handle the Dahl or the Desenclos (not to judge you or anything :p)

-AP
 

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I'm with BlueLight. Play the Glaz and save the Ibert for later. Three or four years later.

The Concertino da Camera is one of those challenges that I think is better left for the more advanced and mature saxophonist. The first movement may sound easy on your recording, but it is deceiving. The second movement is a fierce ride through multiple tonal centers, high lyrical altissimo, and many other challenges.

BL is right, professors don't really like hearing auditions from students attempting to outdo themselves. I'm not denying your ability, but I think the Glaz would be a great choice for you to be musical and to be -consistent- in that musicality.
 

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I'm partial to the Glazonov... any piece with not one but TWO cadenzas is really cool. And, you can show off your double-tonguing (if you can). I was able to single tongue it back in the day. :)
 

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Another vote for the Glazunow. I agree with everything above, and will add that I simply find it to be a much more pleasant piece, as both listener and player. Try playing his saxophone quartet too, if you ever get the chance. In my opinion it's the most wonderful masterwork in the repertoire, and pulling it off with a good quartet is a gem among rewarding musical experiences.
 

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I love both pieces. Used the Glaz last year in our concerto comp and got 2nd. Back in high school, I was going to use the Ibert as my audition, but I just kicked myself so much over it that I finally told my teacher I wasn't going to do it. There are so many things that, if you work on it now and do it wrong, when you HAVE to play it (well.. if you have to), it'll be a lot harder to fix than to learn. I say save the Ibert. It really is a bear, both musically and technically.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for your input everybody. I was leaning towards the Glazunov myself. My friend is doing it right now (for his upcoming audition), so I'll get a copy from him for now. I may buy the Ibert just to have and see it.
 

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I agree with the Glazunov too. The Ibert is one of those "journey" pieces that is good to study when you have enough time to really focus on it. Glazunov is a good "first" concerto, and better for college auditions too.
 

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does anyone else feel like the Glazounov is far too deep for a high schooler to try and interpret (no offense to the high schoolers)? I am personally guilty of playing the Glazounov in high school, but in hindsight, I really feel like this piece is viewed as a "great college audition piece" far too often. I dont mean to ruffle any feathers, but having heard some incredible performances of this piece, I feel like it is given to students far too young. Maybe its just me, but I think it is like giving a Brahms symphony to a youth orchestra...they just arent ready.
 

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Nate94 said:
does anyone else feel like the Glazounov is far too deep for a high schooler to try and interpret (no offense to the high schoolers)? I am personally guilty of playing the Glazounov in high school, but in hindsight, I really feel like this piece is viewed as a "great college audition piece" far too often. I dont mean to ruffle any feathers, but having heard some incredible performances of this piece, I feel like it is given to students far too young. Maybe its just me, but I think it is like giving a Brahms symphony to a youth orchestra...they just arent ready.
If the Glaz is too deep, the Ibert is WAY too deep! The Ibert is much, much harder,when played with the altissimo.
 

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ab1990, FWIW, you might consider contacting the saxophone professors at the schools where you are considering an audition. Some have a set list of pieces that they would like to hear. I see you're from Michigan -- Trent over here at WMU lists Heiden, Creston, Ibert, or Villa-Lobos. The latter two being for transfer students (Ibert) or those who are totally set on playing soprano or tenor for an audition (Villa-Lobos).

In short, it would be worth contacting them to see what they want to hear. It could also lead to a meeting, lesson, tour, etc. It's good to be familiar with these people early.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
thejoyofsax said:
ab1990, FWIW, you might consider contacting the saxophone professors at the schools where you are considering an audition. Some have a set list of pieces that they would like to hear. I see you're from Michigan -- Trent over here at WMU lists Heiden, Creston, Ibert, or Villa-Lobos. The latter two being for transfer students (Ibert) or those who are totally set on playing soprano or tenor for an audition (Villa-Lobos).

In short, it would be worth contacting them to see what they want to hear. It could also lead to a meeting, lesson, tour, etc. It's good to be familiar with these people early.
I really want to go to CMU, and I already know/have had a lesson with the prof. up there (John Nichol). My teacher studied with him, so he should know what he likes to hear.
 

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Nate94 said:
couldn't agree more about the Ibert!
Curiosity...do you go to Ball State? (You list Muncie as your hometown...)
 

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Good choice on CMU! Mr. Nichol really likes to hear the Glazunov in auditions. Though I agree with Nate that it is an extremly deep piece (possibly more than Ibert), I think high schoolers playing it on audtions would let the prof see if the students has an innate sense musianship or not. It is easy to teach technique, but to teach musianship is much more difficult.
 

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Great (and older) forum! I actually just talked to Dr. Nichol recently about buying a new (used) alto, as I haven't played since my last year in HS and my parents sold my Super Action Serie II *tear, tear*. Great guy - and, although you've already played and auditioned the piece, I wish I had known about the Glazunov back in the day. I played Ibert's piece my senior year as a Proficiency III..and the damn thing drove me nuts. I scored a 93/100, and gave up music after (until recently).
 
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