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If you can get a hold of a recording of Rascher playing it, this is really the way to go since the piece was written for him.
 

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Jordan, it's LIVE. He also 'ducks' some notes. However, I think it's a really good example of the piece.

It's a lot more accurate than any recording of Rascher that I've heard.

It's really not a good argument to say that Rascher is the end-all-be-all recording just because it was written for him.

That's like saying that the Feld Concerto should be played by Rousseau because it was written for him.

Or that Cassals is the only one that plays a convincing Bach suite because he was the first to record them.
 

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Lawrence Gwozdz recorded both Glazunov and the vonKoch for Music Minus One. Undoubtedly the best recording of the Glaz you can get commercially, followed very closely by the Rousseau recording that Hakukani mentioned earlier.

I'm lukewarm on the Rascher recording - it's mainly that I can't get over his cadenza. Just not my cup of tea... otherwise a good performance. Rascher's cadenza, though approved by Glazunov, really doesn't have a lot to do with the content of the piece IMHO.

Glazunov is a deceptively difficult concerto, primarily because so few performers get the tempos right. That's what really sets Rousseau and Gwozdz's recordings apart - accurate tempos, in addition to elegant phrasing, etc. Beware! There are tons of crappy recordings/performances of the Glazunov out there. This piece, more than any other in our repertoire, suffers the most from repeated poor performance.
 

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BTW Moose, I did a comparative listening project on the Glazunov for one of my Performance Practice courses in grad school. If you're interested (and if I can dig it up), I'd be more than willing to pass it along to you.
 

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The recording I studied to prepare my master's recital was the one made by Vincent Abato on Nonesuch Records. I no longer have the recording which I am sure is out of print, but I am currently looking for another to transfer to CD. If I find one, I will let you know.
 

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The recording I studied to prepare my master's recital was the one made by Vincent Abato on Nonesuch Records. I no longer have the recording which I am sure is out of print, but I am currently looking for another to transfer to CD. If I find one, I will let you know.
I have it if you want. It's a little scratchy (from the LP)
 

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Lawrence Gwozdz recorded both Glazunov and the vonKoch for Music Minus One. Undoubtedly the best recording of the Glaz you can get commercially, followed very closely by the Rousseau recording that Hakukani mentioned earlier.

I'm lukewarm on the Rascher recording - it's mainly that I can't get over his cadenza. Just not my cup of tea... otherwise a good performance. Rascher's cadenza, though approved by Glazunov, really doesn't have a lot to do with the content of the piece IMHO.

Glazunov is a deceptively difficult concerto, primarily because so few performers get the tempos right. That's what really sets Rousseau and Gwozdz's recordings apart - accurate tempos, in addition to elegant phrasing, etc. Beware! There are tons of crappy recordings/performances of the Glazunov out there. This piece, more than any other in our repertoire, suffers the most from repeated poor performance.
Is it possible to get the Gwozdz recording without getting the music as well?
 

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Lawrence Gwozdz recorded both Glazunov and the vonKoch for Music Minus One. Undoubtedly the best recording of the Glaz you can get commercially, followed very closely by the Rousseau recording that Hakukani mentioned earlier.

I'm lukewarm on the Rascher recording - it's mainly that I can't get over his cadenza. Just not my cup of tea... otherwise a good performance. Rascher's cadenza, though approved by Glazunov, really doesn't have a lot to do with the content of the piece IMHO.

Glazunov is a deceptively difficult concerto, primarily because so few performers get the tempos right. That's what really sets Rousseau and Gwozdz's recordings apart - accurate tempos, in addition to elegant phrasing, etc. Beware! There are tons of crappy recordings/performances of the Glazunov out there. This piece, more than any other in our repertoire, suffers the most from repeated poor performance.
I agree on the cadenza as well, I prefer Glazunov's better.
 

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Jordan - I don't think you can purchase just the recording. But you get the vonKoch too, so...

Honestly, I'm not that crazy about the cadenza Glazunov published either. I recently heard Branford Marsalis play this piece with the NY Phil - he improvised his cadenza, and did a pretty good job of it, too. This piece seems like an ideal candidate for developing your own cadenza.
 

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Jordan - I don't think you can purchase just the recording. But you get the vonKoch too, so...

Honestly, I'm not that crazy about the cadenza Glazunov published either. I recently heard Branford Marsalis play this piece with the NY Phil - he improvised his cadenza, and did a pretty good job of it, too. This piece seems like an ideal candidate for developing your own cadenza.
Lauba's cadenza for the Glazunov was recently published. Pretty interesting. Some nice stuff. It's written in the style of Glaz, so no extended techniques (just a small bit of altissimo here and there towards the end). Richard Ducros recorded it with a symphony (CD is mentioned on his website) but it's available yet.
 

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Lauba's cadenza for the Glazunov was recently published. Pretty interesting. Some nice stuff. It's written in the style of Glaz, so no extended techniques (just a small bit of altissimo here and there towards the end). Richard Ducros recorded it with a symphony (CD is mentioned on his website) but it's available yet.
bezozzi, is this a new separate publication? Or was it added with the standard one with the misprints (not the new Rascher-revised one).

And that Gwozdz recording is incredible. I actually love his von Koch recording on that CD more than the Glazunov (but I love that one too). The "orchestra-only" recordings on there are a nice addition as well for those preparing for concerto competitions or simply wanting to get a feel of the piece with orchestra. And the dividing of sections with different tracks is brilliant IMO.
 

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The Richard Ducros CD is a "single" that only contains the Glazunov in a live performance recorded in May 2010. M. Ducros plays brillantly with the Orchestre Symphonique de Mulhouse, conducted by John Neschling. Like bezozzi, I really like Christian Lauba's cadenza and find it stylistically appropriate.

Ironically, I was able to obtain this CD from M. Lauba after communicating with him via YouTube. See his YouTube channel at:

http://www.youtube.com/user/TUBEARCACHON

You'll find he's an incredibly gracious person in addition to being one of the true giants among contemporary composers for the saxophone.

I'd also highly recommend the CDs of Richard Ducros. His 2009 CD, "Hard", featuring M. Lauba's compositions exclusively, was one of the two best of all the many saxophone CDs I bought last year. Mesmerizing pieces played with astonishing artistry,considering how technically challenging the music is. This CD was available on cdbaby.com, but I see it isn't listed anymore. Pity!

His other CD, "Au Bonheur des Dames", can still be purchased at cdbaby.com and it's a wonderful romp. This recording features pieces written by or associated with the great Rudy Wiedoeft; the CD's title track, however, was composed by M. Lauba under his pseudonym, Jean Matitia.
 
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