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Discussion Starter #1
Hello! Tell me about this saxophone: Conn 10M Lady Face 1933, № 259 ***?
It has 90% lacquer. I do not know is the original lacquer or not? He needs a job replacement pads, I'll do it myself. Its price is 1000$ - this is a good price?
Thank you!
Conn.jpg Conn LF.jpg
 

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I would think a 10M is well worth $1000.00. It doesn't look like it is in too bad a shape. Some people on here are experts with Conn Saxophones,so they should be able to answer your questions.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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It's a Transitional, ie it has features of both the pre 33 Chu Berry New Wonder and the 34 Naked Lady, often quite sought after. I'd say good value. Hopefully it's just pads and not too much body or tone hole work, if so you are in for quite a job as the tone holes are rolled.
 

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I agree, this is a tranny, not a 10M. Thousand is an good price for a tranny in good shape like this one appears to be in, the serial number looks fishy to me though, the number indicates a late tranny where the split bell keys indicate an earlier model. Really, more of a Chu then a 10M. Maybe the reason for the lower price. Not sure when split bell keys ended in the tranny, so that could be accurate, don't know.
 

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I have had a couple of those and they had split bell keys up to the low 262### as I have had 2 in that range. I would say its a good buy....just bear in mind the left hand stack in all chu and keys are more spread apart than a true 10m.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all for your reply!
Conn is my second tenor. First, in excellent condition Selmer SA80-II 1988. On it are still the original pads.
I'll have to make a choice between the two saxophones.
I have not heard the sound of my Conn, but this sax in good condition, no dents. The plane of the tone hole, I did exactly. Now I need to order the pads. The choice was between:
1.Conn Res-O-Pads
2.Saxgourmet Pads
3.TopTone disk
I decided to stay on Saxgourmet Pads. I will make on a lathe from brass resonators, such as ResoTech Resonators. These resonators have decided to use also for Selmer SA80 tenor and alto Yamaha-62.
Tell how these resonators affect the sound? Or do not waste your time and use a standard plastic?
 

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Based on those pictures, it looks to be in fairly good condition (though always hard to tell with certainty until it's in your own hands). The price seems decent, especially if you keep the overall cost down by doing all the necessary work yourself.

The reso debate can go any number of ways, but I have old Conn's with both plastic and metal resonators and I don't have problems with either (though I'm not a fan of plastic resonators on saxes that old, but it's purely a personal preference).

I agree, this is a tranny, not a 10M.
Actually, it is a 10M. 10M in relation to Conn simply means that it's a tenor, and this designation was used for even earlier models as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Use a standard pad.
"Use a standard pad" - a Conn Res-O-Pads?
You want to say what to do resonator made of brass in size a little less tone hole, it makes no sense?
I think to buy a saxophone pads in the store «musicmedic» http://www.musicmedic.com/catalog/categories/cat_5.html
I last ordered a Precision Saxophone Pads for YAS-62.
I was not thrilled by them, the skin is not durable. Now I want to try Saxgourmet Pads kangaroo leather.
 

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Personally I would use Conn Reso-ring pads or flat metal disc of medium density. I've always wondered whether these Ladyface trannys had a 10M bore or New Wonder bore, just as an aside, sound wise, it will blow the Serie11 Selmer out the water!
 

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I used to have one, I think, around 262***. I'm pretty sure the bore was more Chu than 10M, it had a big ol sound. I had mine repadded with standard pads with plastic resonators. If I had to do it again, I'd use standard pads, but I would be tempted to use either flat resos or just rivets. Domed resonators take up some volume in the tone hole, and I have a hunch that this contributes some to this horn's intonation quirks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Personally I would use Conn Reso-ring pads or flat metal disc of medium density. I've always wondered whether these Ladyface trannys had a 10M bore or New Wonder bore, just as an aside, sound wise, it will blow the Serie11 Selmer out the water!
I used to have one, I think, around 262***. I'm pretty sure the bore was more Chu than 10M, it had a big ol sound. I had mine repadded with standard pads with plastic resonators. If I had to do it again, I'd use standard pads, but I would be tempted to use either flat resos or just rivets. Domed resonators take up some volume in the tone hole, and I have a hunch that this contributes some to this horn's intonation quirks.
Pay attention to the video with 3:58 minutes. I think this sax used ResoTech Resonators. It seems that this is not for beauty.
http://www.tamtamforpeace.org/index.php?section=pages&item=Conn-o-sax
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUieJ2HS_kg&feature=player_embedded#at=239

I can not correctly translate the sentence:
«Though designed to fix into key-cups purely via friction, most saxophone repairers glue them in place using shellac or hot melt adhesive» Conn Reso-ring pads are installed via friction, shellac or hot glue is not applied?
It turns out that the pads mutes the pad cup. Perhaps in the old tools do not need to amplify the resonance of the saxophone by attaching resonators to the pad cup?
Here's an article from the Internet:
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In the early 1930s, C. G. Conn developed a special type of saxophone pad specifically designed for use on saxophones with rolled toneholes called Conn "Res-o-Pads".[1] These have an internal metal reinforcing ring which is hidden under the leather covering around the circumference of the pad. Their most notable feature is that the diameter of the pad extends over the rim of the key-cup, thereby giving a slightly wider surface area for the rolled tone-hole to seal onto. Rim impressions from Res-o-Pads are minimal and unlike standard pads they cannot be "floated" in. Though designed to fix into key-cups purely via friction, most saxophone repairers glue them in place using shellac or hot melt adhesive. Res-o-Pads can be challenging to size correctly because (unlike standard saxophone pads which come in 0.5 mm size steps) they are only available in 1/32nds of an inch sizes which may not always correspond closely to key-cup diameters. Newly produced Conn Res-o-Pads are still available from specialist suppliers and are favored by some saxophone collectors because they give a fully authentic look and feel to vintage saxophones with rolled toneholes. However, it is possible to fit standard pads to any saxophone with rolled toneholes (and many people do) without any noticeable disadvantage regarding the quality of sound produced.
-----------------------------------
With them will be a problem with the size and installation. If it were possible to get to the store and choose the size of the pad cup? And I'll be ordering from overseas by mail.
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I also want to clarify about prices Conn. I understand that it is the market and prices can be different. If we take into account article, written by Steve Goodson, then in good condition, my sax can cost at least $ 2000??
"TRANSITIONAL" 240XXX – 260XXX
Alto $ 2400
Tenor $ 3000
Baritone $ 3100
http://www.saxgourmet.com/VINTAGE_SAXOPHONE_VALUE_GUIDE.htm
 

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Pay attention to the video with 3:58 minutes. I think this sax used ResoTech Resonators. It seems that this is not for beauty.
http://www.tamtamforpeace.org/index.php?section=pages&item=Conn-o-sax
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vUieJ2HS_kg&feature=player_embedded#at=239

I can not correctly translate the sentence:
«Though designed to fix into key-cups purely via friction, most saxophone repairers glue them in place using shellac or hot melt adhesive» Conn Reso-ring pads are installed via friction, shellac or hot glue is not applied?
It turns out that the pads mutes the pad cup. Perhaps in the old tools do not need to amplify the resonance of the saxophone by attaching resonators to the pad cup?
Here's an article from the Internet:
-------------------------------
In the early 1930s, C. G. Conn developed a special type of saxophone pad specifically designed for use on saxophones with rolled toneholes called Conn "Res-o-Pads".[1] These have an internal metal reinforcing ring which is hidden under the leather covering around the circumference of the pad. Their most notable feature is that the diameter of the pad extends over the rim of the key-cup, thereby giving a slightly wider surface area for the rolled tone-hole to seal onto. Rim impressions from Res-o-Pads are minimal and unlike standard pads they cannot be "floated" in. Though designed to fix into key-cups purely via friction, most saxophone repairers glue them in place using shellac or hot melt adhesive. Res-o-Pads can be challenging to size correctly because (unlike standard saxophone pads which come in 0.5 mm size steps) they are only available in 1/32nds of an inch sizes which may not always correspond closely to key-cup diameters. Newly produced Conn Res-o-Pads are still available from specialist suppliers and are favored by some saxophone collectors because they give a fully authentic look and feel to vintage saxophones with rolled toneholes. However, it is possible to fit standard pads to any saxophone with rolled toneholes (and many people do) without any noticeable disadvantage regarding the quality of sound produced.
-----------------------------------
With them will be a problem with the size and installation. If it were possible to get to the store and choose the size of the pad cup? And I'll be ordering from overseas by mail.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I also want to clarify about prices Conn. I understand that it is the market and prices can be different. If we take into account article, written by Steve Goodson, then in good condition, my sax can cost at least $ 2000??
"TRANSITIONAL" 240XXX – 260XXX
Alto $ 2400
Tenor $ 3000
Baritone $ 3100
http://www.saxgourmet.com/VINTAGE_SAXOPHONE_VALUE_GUIDE.htm
I've never taken anything by Steve Goodson into account. And the trickiest thing about vintage tenors is that they are worth what the market will bare. I would say this is a good deal, but I would also say to keep it original - Res-o-pads.

- John
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've never taken anything by Steve Goodson into account. And the trickiest thing about vintage tenors is that they are worth what the market will bare. I would say this is a good deal, but I would also say to keep it original - Res-o-pads.

- John
ОК! Thank you! I noticed that many the forum participants, owners of vintage Conn, used for the horns of original - Res-o-pads.
 
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