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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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I wouldn't want to step in it - or listen to it.
 

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Potter does a rendition of GS in a slower blues flavor,... sounds pretty good too! I remember seeing a YouTube of it a while back. Think he was visiting a University or something.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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G∆ | Bb7 Eb∆ | F#7 B∆ | D7 G7/Db |
C...

It's not a "bluesy" chord progression (neither was Bird changes) but it's a unique way to get to IV.

The important thing to remember about Coltrane changes is that the intervals between key centers is what gives it an 'out' sound. In G we're talking about Eb and B -- MAJOR! It doesn't have the same zest if these tonalities aren't clearly defined. This isn't the place for harmonic ambiguity. FWIW, G-B-D# (key centers) is an augmented sound. Major Key Centers, Augmented, -- this is the antithesis of "bluesy", but then again a tool is a tool.
 

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I'm not sure I would suggest this but I guess you could try |G7 |C7 Eb7|Ab B7|E G7|C7 | That will get you there. It start on the IV chord on measure two and gets you to the IV chord on measure 5.
Yep. Or use the tritone to get you to bar 5: |G7 |C7 A7|D F7|Bb Db7|C |
You could also use the F minor route: |G7 |C7 Db|E7 A|C7 Fm Bb7|C | But I'm not sure if the jazz police would agree :mrgreen:

Plenty of other options too.
 

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It's not a "bluesy" chord progression (neither was Bird changes) but it's a unique way to get to IV..
Actually Bird changes are "bluesy." They sound good and if you play over them in a blues style (as Bird did), it will sound like the blues. However, I can't imagine any way to make Giant Steps changes fit the blues. Maybe Trane could do it...

But I don't see the problem of leading into the IV chord in a blues. If you want a smooth transition, why not just voice lead from the 3rd or b7th of the I chord? Like this in a C blues: E to Eb, or Bb to A. Simple and effective. Why make it so bloody complicated?

Man, if a keyboard player or guitarist started playing "Giant Steps" changes or some other crazy set of chords over the first 4 bars of a blues while I was soloing, I'd want to shoot them!!
 

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Major Key Centers, Augmented, -- this is the antithesis of "bluesy", but then again a tool is a tool.
And as when using any tool, find the appropriate application. Just because you have a hammer doesn't mean that everything is a nail.
 
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