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Recently, I've started learning how to "ghost" notes, most often in jazz pieces (shown by an "x" instead of the note). The technique I've been taught involves closing off half of the reed so that the note is articulated, but does not sound as accented as the note which follows it. I know that other players have different methods, such as using just a very light tongue, or skipping the note entirely. I've been having some trouble with my method (albeit, with time, I'm sure I'll get it), and I'm just wondering how all of you approach it.

Thanks!
 

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My teacher told everyone in class "Think of the note reallly really hard and finger it, but don't play it" :D That and listening to people who really know how to do it works for me...
 

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rs1sensen said:
I know that other players have different methods, such as using just a very light tongue, or skipping the note entirely. I've been having some trouble with my method (albeit, with time, I'm sure I'll get it), and I'm just wondering how all of you approach it.

Thanks!
What really makes ghosting effective, at least to my ear, has more to do with rhythm than with the note itself. I think a good approach would be to practice leaving the note out entirely to get the timing right (usually you are introducing a more syncopated feel), then experiment with "touching" the note lightly so you are only implying it. This is hard to describe, but focus on the rhythmic feel first and foremost. That's my approach. Others may have some different ideas.
 

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I think "nnnn", where my tongue kinda stays on the reed for the ghosted note. Still working on it, and have been for a long time. I hope you get a bunch of answers on this, cause I'm sure there're many, many ways cats "ghost" notes, and I'm curious to read all the answers.
 
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