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I agree you can approach that tone with your air and embouchure control. For me, I got there quicker with a bright, open tip mouthpiece, and a softer reed, like a Plasticover #2. After I got used to that tone, I found I could get close with a different reed, and even a Link STM. My Link is not as loud as my paintpeeler, but I can get a lot of edge that translates in a moderate environment, and a mic. So, my advice is get a bright mouthpiece (Bellite, Dukoff D, Quantum, even a lowly Metalite, etc), get some soft reeds, and get that tone in your head.
Are you talking about a tenor sax or an alto? The OP is playing an alto, which is a different matter entirely (from tenor), imo. I don't think you necessarily need a high baffle or especially 'bright' mpc to get a bright sound on the alto. Alto is pretty bright to begin with. It really doesn't take any particular mpc to get a bright sound on alto. saxphil, Pete Thomas, and some others on this thread have the right idea. It's how you blow the horn; doesn't take any great effort to brighten up an alto. And very easy to play it a bit too bright (especially if you put a high baffle mpc on it). Just a thought....

Iceman, I think your tone quality is quite good. And it fits the type of ballad you're playing in that clip. In the other clip, that guy is playing with a lot of "processing", reverb, etc. And he's putting plenty of air in the horn. I bet if you simply put more air in your horn (blow harder) with some 'attitude', the sound would brighten up plenty. Sounds pretty simplistic, but give it a go. And yeah, listen to and emulate Maceo!!
 

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Are you talking about a tenor sax or an alto? The OP is playing an alto, which is a different matter entirely (from tenor), imo. I don't think you necessarily need a high baffle or especially 'bright' mpc to get a bright sound on the alto. Alto is pretty bright to begin with. It really doesn't take any particular mpc to get a bright sound on alto. saxphil, Pete Thomas, and some others on this thread have the right idea. It's how you blow the horn; doesn't take any great effort to brighten up an alto. And very easy to play it a bit too bright (especially if you put a high baffle mpc on it). Just a thought....

Iceman, I think your tone quality is quite good. And it fits the type of ballad you're playing in that clip. In the other clip, that guy is playing with a lot of "processing", reverb, etc. And he's putting plenty of air in the horn. I bet if you simply put more air in your horn (blow harder) with some 'attitude', the sound would brighten up plenty. Sounds pretty simplistic, but give it a go. And yeah, listen to and emulate Maceo!!
I was picturing a tenor, but I did the same with alto. I sometimes compete with Marshall stacks, so I went to the extreme, and worked my way back. Its what worked for me, so it will work for some others.
 

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Alto: YAS-62S Conn Trany 6M Jupiter JAS-868 JAS-769 / Tenor: YTS-23 & 52 P. Mauriat 66R Holton 241
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There's a lot of good and valuable advices in this thread. The guy in the video is playing a mouthpiece which seems to be a Vandoren Jumbo Java clone, these mouthpieces tend to be very, very bright, too much for my taste. Also the reference recording was done on a studio with a LDC condenser microphone and then processed (EQ, compression, reverb, ...). Your recording was done in a church (large room reverberation) with a camera or cell phone built-in microphone. I mean, I'm not completely sure you sound exactly like the audio in your video. I guess the best to know how you really sound is to record yourself in a proper environment, that would give you the starting point and since then you could start experimenting with changes in your equipment and/or embouchure and keep making recordings. In the equipment department I'd begin making small changes like a softer/brighter reed, I know a guy who can sound like the guy in the video using a Selmer HR classic mouthpiece if using the right reed. A Meyer mouthpiece should be enough to get that kind of sound with the right reed. The player has far more influence in the tone than the equipment, the equipment is just a tool and since it's true certain tools are better for certain works you should be able to do the work with most of the available tools.
 
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